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Jackie Stewart

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Sir John Young "Jackie" Stewart (born June 11, 1939 in Milton, West Dunbartonshire, Scotland), is a former Formula One three-time World Champion. He was nicknamed The Flying Scot.

Early lifeEdit

Sir Jackie's family were Jaguar car dealers and had built up a successful business, Dumbuck Garage, in Milton. His father had been an amateur motorcycle racer, and his brother Jimmy was a racing driver.

In his early days Jackie was an excellent clay pigeon shooter and was a member of the 1959 British Team. However, in 1961 he followed his brother Jimmy's lead and entered racing in a Marcos sports car, initially using the name "A. N. Other".

Racing career Edit

Ken Tyrrell signed him up in 1964 for Formula Three and, after winning his first F3 race at Snetterton, he turned down an opportunity to move up to F1. In 1965 Jackie made his F1 debut when he finished sixth in a BRM in the South African Grand Prix. Only seven GP's later he won his first F1 race when he took the chequered flag for BRM in the Italian Grand Prix. Stewart finished his rookie season with three seconds, a third, a fifth, and a sixth, and third place in the World Drivers' Championship. He also piloted Tyrrell's unsuccessful F2 Cooper T75-BRM, and ran the Rover Company's revolutionary turbine car at Le Mans.

1966 saw him almost win the Indianapolis 500 on his first attempt, in John Mecom's Lola T90-Ford, only to be denied by a broken scavenge pump while leading by over a lap with eight laps to go; however, Stewart's performance, having had the race fully in hand and sidelined only by mechanical failure, won him Rookie of the Year honours, the only occasion to date in race history a rookie winner (Graham Hill, team mate at Indianapolis as well, and final leader after Stewart) was deemed surpassed in performance by another rookie. Also, in 1966, a crash triggered his fight for improved safety in racing. On lap one of the 1966 Belgian Grand Prix at Spa-Francorchamps, when sudden rain caused many crashes, he found himself trapped in his overturned BRM, getting soaked by leaking fuel. Any spark could cause a disaster. The marshals had no tools to help him, and it took his teammate Hill and Bob Bondurant, who had both also crashed nearby, to get him out. Since then, a main switch for electrics and a removable steering wheel have become standard. Also, noticing the long and slow transport to a hospital, he brought his own doctor to future races, while the BRM supplied a medical truck for the benefit of all. It was a poor year all around; the BRMs were notoriously unreliable, although Stewart did win the Monaco Grand Prix. Stewart had some success in other forms of racing during the year, winning the 1966 Tasman Series and the 1966 Rothmans 12 Hour International Sports Car Race. BRM's fortunes did not improve in 1967, during which Stewart came no higher than second at Spa, though he won F2 events for Tyrrell at Karlskoga, Enna, Oulton Park, and Albi in a Matra M5S or M7S.

In Formula One, he gambled on a switch to Tyrrell's team, where he drove a Matra-Ford for the 1968 and 1969 seasons. Skill (and improving tyres from Dunlop) brought a win in heavy rain at Zandvoort. Another win in rain and fog at the Nürburgring, where he won by a margin of four minutes, is considered as one of the finest ever, even though his rain tyres were probably better than those of the competition. He also took Watkins Glen, but missed Jarama and Monaco due to an F2 injury at Jarama, had the car fail at Mexico City, and so lost the driving title to Hill.

With wins at Kyalami, Jarama, Zandvoort, Charade, Silverstone, and Monza, Stewart became world champion in 1969 in a Matra MS80-Cosworth. Until September 2005, when Fernando Alonso in a Renault became champion, he was the only driver to have won the championship driving for a French marque and, as Alonso's Renault was actually built in the UK, Stewart remains the only driver to win the world championship in a French-built car.

For 1970, Matra (just taken over by Chrysler) insisted on using their own V12 engines, while Tyrrell and Stewart wanted to keep the Cosworths as well as the good connection to Ford. As a consequence, the Tyrrell team bought a chassis from March Engineering; Stewart took the March 701-Cosworth to wins at the Daily Mail Race of Champions and Jarama, but was soon overcome by Lotus' new 72. The new Tyrrell 001-Cosworth, appearing in August, was extremely fast but suffered problems. Stewart saw better days for it in 1971, and stayed on. Tyrrell continued to be sponsored by French fuel company Elf, and Stewart raced in a car painted French Racing Blue for many years. Stewart also continued to race sporadically in Formula Two, winning at the Crystal Palace and placing at Thruxton; a projected Le Mans appearance, to co-drive the muscular 4.5 litre Porsche 917K with Steve McQueen, did not come off, for McQueen's inability to get insurance. He also tried Can-Am in the revolutionary Chaparral 2J, but the car broke down in his only appearance.

Stewart went on to win the Formula One world championship in 1971 using the excellent Tyrrell 003-Cosworth, winning Spain, Monaco, France, Britain, Germany, and Canada. He also did a full season in Can-Am, managing to beat the juggernaut McLarens at St. Jovite and Mid-Ohio driving a Lola T260. In the 1972 season he missed the Belgian GP at Nivelles, due to gastritis which was developed following frequent travelling, and had to cancel plans to drive a Can-Am McLaren, but won the Argentine, French, U.S., and Canadian Grands Prix, to come second to Emerson Fittipaldi in the drivers' standings. Stewart also competed in a Ford Capri RS2600 in the European Touring Car Championship, with F1 teammate François Cevert and other F1 pilots, at a time where the competition between Ford and BMW was at a height. Stewart shared a Capri with Cevert in the 1972 6 hours of Paul Ricard, finishing second. He also received an OBE.

Entering the 1973 season, Stewart had decided to retire at the end of the season. He nevertheless won at South Africa, Belgium, Monaco, Holland, and Germany. His last (and then record-setting) 27th victory came at the Nürburgring with a convincing 1-2 for Tyrrell. "Nothing gave me more satisfaction than to win at the Nürburgring and yet, I was always afraid." Stewart later said. "When I left home for the German Grand Prix I always used to pause at the end of the driveway and take a long look back. I was never sure I'd come home again." After the fatal crash of his teammate (and close friend) François Cevert in practice for the 1973 United States Grand Prix at Watkins Glen, Stewart retired one race earlier than intended and missed what would have been his 100th GP.

Formula One Statistical OverviewEdit

F1 Career RecordEdit

Year Entrant Team WDC Points WDC Pos. Report
1965 Owen Racing Organisation BRM 33 (34) 3rd Report
1966 Owen Racing Organisation BRM 7 14th Report
1967 Owen Racing Organisation BRM 10 9th Report
1968 Matra International Matra-Ford Cosworth 36 2nd Report
1969 Matra International Matra-Ford Cosworth 63 1st Report
1970 Tyrrell Racing Organisation March-Ford Cosworth 25 5th Report
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
1971 Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 62 1st Report
1972 Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 45 2nd Report
1973 Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 71 1st Report

StatisticsEdit

Entries 101
Starts 99
Pole Positions 17
Front Row Starts 42
Race Wins 27
Podiums 43
Fastest laps 15
Points 360
Laps Raced 5225
Distance Raced 25835.284 km
Races Led 51
Laps Led 1921
Distance Led 9190.601 km
Doubles 8
Hat-Tricks 4
Grand Chelems 4

Race WinsEdit

Win Number Grand Prix
1 1965 Italian Grand Prix
2 1966 Monaco Grand Prix
3 1968 Dutch Grand Prix
4 1968 German Grand Prix
5 1968 United States Grand Prix
6 1969 South African Grand Prix
7 1969 Spanish Grand Prix
8 1969 Dutch Grand Prix
9 1969 French Grand Prix
10 1969 British Grand Prix
11 1969 Italian Grand Prix
12 1970 Spanish Grand Prix
13 1971 Spanish Grand Prix
14 1971 Monaco Grand Prix
15 1971 French Grand Prix
16 1971 British Grand Prix
17 1971 German Grand Prix
18 1971 Canadian Grand Prix
19 1972 Argentine Grand Prix
20 1972 French Grand Prix
21 1972 Canadian Grand Prix
22 1972 United States Grand Prix
23 1973 South African Grand Prix
24 1973 Belgian Grand Prix
25 1973 Monaco Grand Prix
26 1973 Dutch Grand Prix
27 1973 German Grand Prix

Career ResultsEdit

Complete Formula One results
Year 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Pts Pos
1965 Flag of South Africa 1928-1994 Flag of Monaco Flag of Belgium Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of the Netherlands Flag of Germany Flag of Italy Flag of the United States Flag of Mexico 33 (34) 3rd
6th 3rd 2nd 2nd 5th 2nd Ret 1st Ret Ret
1966 Flag of Monaco Flag of Belgium Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of the Netherlands Flag of Germany Flag of Italy Flag of the United States Flag of Mexico 7 14th
1st Ret INJ Ret 4th 5th Ret Ret Ret
1967 Flag of South Africa 1928-1994 Flag of Monaco Flag of the Netherlands Flag of Belgium Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of Germany Flag of Canada Flag of Italy Flag of the United States Flag of Mexico 10 9th
Ret Ret Ret 2nd 3rd Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret
1968 Flag of South Africa 1928-1994 Flag of Spain 1945 1977 Flag of Monaco Flag of Belgium Flag of the Netherlands Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of Germany Flag of Italy Flag of Canada Flag of the United States Flag of Mexico 36 2nd
Ret INJ INJ 4th 1st 3rd 6th 1st Ret 6th 1st 7th
1969 Flag of South Africa 1928-1994 Flag of Spain 1945 1977 Flag of Monaco Flag of the Netherlands Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of Germany Flag of Italy Flag of Canada Flag of the United States Flag of Mexico 63 1st
1st 1st Ret 1st 1st 1st 2nd 1st Ret Ret 4th
1970 Flag of South Africa 1928-1994 Flag of Spain 1945 1977 Flag of Monaco Flag of Belgium Flag of the Netherlands Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of Germany Flag of Austria Flag of Italy Flag of Canada Flag of the United States Flag of Mexico 25 5th
3rd 1st Ret Ret 2nd 9th Ret Ret Ret 2nd Ret Ret Ret
1971 Flag of South Africa 1928-1994 Flag of Spain 1945 1977 Flag of Monaco Flag of the Netherlands Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of Germany Flag of Austria Flag of Italy Flag of Canada Flag of the United States 62 1st
2nd 1st 1st 11th 1st 1st 1st Ret Ret 1st 5th
1972 Flag of Argentina Flag of South Africa 1928-1994 Flag of Spain 1945 1977 Flag of Monaco Flag of Belgium Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of Germany Flag of Austria Flag of Italy Flag of Canada Flag of the United States 45 2nd
1st Ret Ret 4th ILL 1st 2nd 11th 7th Ret 1st 1st
1973 Flag of Argentina Flag of Brazil Flag of South Africa 1928-1994 Flag of Spain 1945 1977 Flag of Belgium Flag of Monaco Flag of Sweden Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of the Netherlands Flag of Germany Flag of Austria Flag of Italy Flag of Canada Flag of the United States 71 1st
3rd 2nd 1st Ret 1st 1st 5th 4th 10th 1st 1st 2nd 4th 5th DNS


Key
Symbol Meaning Symbol Meaning
1stWinner Ret Retired
2ndPodium finish DSQ Disqualified
3rd DNQ Did not qualify
5thPoints finish DNPQ Did not pre-qualify
14thNon-points finish TD Test driver
NCNon-classified finish (<90% race distance) DNS Did not start
[+] More Symbols

NotesEdit


External linksEdit

V T E List of World Drivers' Champions
1950: Giuseppe Farina
1951: Juan Manuel Fangio
1952: Alberto Ascari
1953: Alberto Ascari
1954: Juan Manuel Fangio
1955: Juan Manuel Fangio
1956: Juan Manuel Fangio
1957: Juan Manuel Fangio
1958: Mike Hawthorn
1959: Jack Brabham
1960: Jack Brabham
1961: Phil Hill
1962: Graham Hill
1963: Jim Clark
1964: John Surtees
1965: Jim Clark
1966: Jack Brabham
1967: Denny Hulme
1968: Graham Hill
1969: Jackie Stewart
1970: Jochen Rindt
1971: Jackie Stewart
1972: Emerson Fittipaldi
1973: Jackie Stewart
1974: Emerson Fittipaldi
1975: Niki Lauda
1976: James Hunt
1977: Niki Lauda
1978: Mario Andretti
1979: Jody Scheckter
1980: Alan Jones
1981: Nelson Piquet
1982: Keke Rosberg
1983: Nelson Piquet
1984: Niki Lauda
1985: Alain Prost
1986: Alain Prost
1987: Nelson Piquet
1988: Ayrton Senna
1989: Alain Prost
1990: Ayrton Senna
1991: Ayrton Senna
1992: Nigel Mansell
1993: Alain Prost
1994: Michael Schumacher
1995: Michael Schumacher
1996: Damon Hill
1997: Jacques Villeneuve
1998: Mika Häkkinen
1999: Mika Häkkinen
2000: Michael Schumacher
2001: Michael Schumacher
2002: Michael Schumacher
2003: Michael Schumacher
2004: Michael Schumacher
2005: Fernando Alonso
2006: Fernando Alonso
2007: Kimi Räikkönen
2008: Lewis Hamilton
2009: Jenson Button
2010: Sebastian Vettel
2011: Sebastian Vettel
2012: Sebastian Vettel
2013: Sebastian Vettel
2014: Lewis Hamilton
2015: Lewis Hamilton
2016: Nico Rosberg
V T E List of World Drivers' Championship runners-up
1950: Juan Manuel Fangio
1951: Alberto Ascari
1952: Giuseppe Farina
1953: Juan Manuel Fangio
1954: José Froilán González
1955: Stirling Moss
1956: Stirling Moss
1957: Stirling Moss
1958: Stirling Moss
1959: Tony Brooks
1960: Bruce McLaren
1961: Wolfgang von Trips
1962: Jim Clark
1963: Graham Hill
1964: Graham Hill
1965: Graham Hill
1966: John Surtees
1967: Jack Brabham
1968: Jackie Stewart
1969: Jacky Ickx
1970: Jacky Ickx
1971: Ronnie Peterson
1972: Jackie Stewart
1973: Emerson Fittipaldi
1974: Clay Regazzoni
1975: Emerson Fittipaldi
1976: Niki Lauda
1977: Jody Scheckter
1978: Ronnie Peterson
1979: Gilles Villeneuve
1980: Nelson Piquet
1981: Carlos Reutemann
1982: Didier Pironi
1983: Alain Prost
1984: Alain Prost
1985: Michele Alboreto
1986: Nigel Mansell
1987: Nigel Mansell
1988: Alain Prost
1989: Ayrton Senna
1990: Alain Prost
1991: Nigel Mansell
1992: Riccardo Patrese
1993: Ayrton Senna
1994: Damon Hill
1995: Damon Hill
1996: Jacques Villeneuve
1997: Heinz-Harald Frentzen*
1998: Michael Schumacher
1999: Eddie Irvine
2000: Mika Häkkinen
2001: David Coulthard
2002: Rubens Barrichello
2003: Kimi Räikkönen
2004: Rubens Barrichello
2005: Kimi Räikkönen
2006: Michael Schumacher
2007: Lewis Hamilton
2008: Felipe Massa
2009: Sebastian Vettel
2010: Fernando Alonso
2011: Jenson Button
2012: Fernando Alonso
2013: Fernando Alonso
2014: Nico Rosberg
2015: Nico Rosberg
2016: Lewis Hamilton
* Michael Schumacher was disqualified from the 1997 championship.
V T E Grand Prix Drivers' Association
Chairman
Moss • Bonnier • Stewart • Scheckter • Pironi • Senna • M. Schumacher • Coulthard • R. Schumacher • De la Rosa • Heidfeld • Barrichello • Wurz
Directors
M. Schumacher • Berger • Brundle • D. Hill • Coulthard • Wurz • Trulli • Webber • R. Schumacher • Alonso • De la Rosa • Heidfeld • Massa • Vettel • Barrichello • Button
Affected races
1969 Belgian Grand Prix • 1970 German Grand Prix • 1982 South African Grand Prix • 1994 San Marino Grand Prix
Related
Professional Racing Drivers Assocation
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