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The 1991 Japanese Grand Prix was the penultimate round of the 1991 Formula One Championship, held at a circuit which had played a crucial role in the Championship numerous times in the past.[1] Suzuka had seen Ayrton Senna claim his both of his World Championships, and it was the Brazilian who was favourite to repeat the feat once again, leading Nigel Mansell by 16 points, with only 20 left to fight for.[1]

Indeed, it was to be Senna's day, as Mansell (who needed to win both of the remaining races to stand any chance of taking the title) retired early on, while Senna and team mate Gerhard Berger streaked ahead.[1] Senna allowed Berger to take the victory, a thank you for the work that Berger had done to aid him over the previous two seasons, with Riccardo Patrese fighting his way onto the podium.[1]

BackgroundEdit

With the end of the season fast approaching, most of the focus was on the Championship battle, although Ayrton Senna was the outright favourite. His lead of 16 meant that Nigel Mansell, the only man who could mathematically defeat him, would have to win both of the remaining races outright, with Senna finishing fifth or lower in both. Form, however, was no guide to how the Championship could go, as Mansell was arguably driving to the best of his ability, but luck had not been on his side through most of 1991.

The Constructors' Championship could also be decided in Japan, although the likelihood of it being so was remote. Williams-Renault lead the title battle by a single point from McLaren-Honda, and would win the Championship if Mansell and Riccardo Patrese claimed a one-two, and the two McLarens of Senna and Gerhard Berger retired. Once again, form was no help in pointing to one team or the other, as the Williams FW14 was superior to the McLaren MP4/6, but was decidedly more delicate through its semi-automatic gearbox.

Away from the title battle, most of the news focused on preparations for the 1992 Championship. One team who looked destined not to make it were AGS, who could not afford to send their two cars to Japan, leaving Fabrizio Barbazza and Olivier Grouillard on the sidelines.[1] Elsewhere, Footwork finally ended the speculation surrounding their return to Porsche by announcing a new engine partnership with Honda, who would provide them with V10 engines for the 1992 season, race prepared by Mugen.[1]

While Minardi also made an announcement concerning their switch from Ferrari to Lamborghini power for 1992, attention was focused on another new face to the Championship.[1] Karl Wendlinger joined Leyton House after the arrest of Akira Akagi, their principle investor, with the team dropping Ivan Capelli for Wendlinger's sponsorship money.[1] Another change came at Lotus, where Johnny Herbert once again returned to his seat, leaving Michael Bartels on the sidelines.[1]

Familiar faces also returned to the paddock in Japan, with Coloni signing up a pay driver, Naoki Hattori to race at his home Grand Prix, with the team having missed the 1991 Spanish Grand Prix.[1] Also spotted was Bertrand Gachot, who hoped to return to his Jordan seat having served his two month prison sentence.[1] Eddie Jordan, however, was relatively happy with the money and talent of Alex Zanardi and Andrea de Cesaris, and so Gachot did not return to action in Japan.[1]

Entry ListEdit

The full entry list for the 1991 Japanese Grand Prix is shown below:

No. Driver Entrant Constructor Chassis Engine Model Tyre
1 Brazil Ayrton Senna United Kingdom Honda Marlboro McLaren McLaren MP4/6 Honda RA121E V10 3.5 G
2 Austria Gerhard Berger United Kingdom Honda Marlboro McLaren McLaren MP4/6 Honda RA121E V10 3.5 G
3 Japan Satoru Nakajima United Kingdom Braun Tyrrell Honda Tyrrell 020 Honda RA101E V10 3.5 P
4 Italy Stefano Modena United Kingdom Braun Tyrrell Honda Tyrrell 020 Honda RA101E V10 3.5 P
5 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell United Kingdom Canon Williams Team Williams FW14 Renault RS3 V10 3.5 G
6 Italy Riccardo Patrese United Kingdom Canon Williams Team Williams FW14 Renault RS3 V10 3.5 G
7 United Kingdom Martin Brundle United Kingdom Motor Racing Developments Ltd. Brabham BT60Y Yamaha OX99 V12 3.5 P
8 United Kingdom Mark Blundell United Kingdom Motor Racing Developments Ltd. Brabham BT60Y Yamaha OX99 V12 3.5 P
9 Italy Michele Alboreto United Kingdom Footwork Grand Prix International Footwork A12 Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
10 Italy Alex Caffi United Kingdom Footwork Grand Prix International Footwork A12 Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
11 Finland Mika Häkkinen United Kingdom Team Lotus Lotus 102B Judd EV V8 3.5 G
12 United Kingdom Johnny Herbert United Kingdom Team Lotus Lotus 102B Judd EV V8 3.5 G
14 Italy Gabriele Tarquini Italy Fondmetal F1 SpA Fondmetal FA1 M-E Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
15 Brazil Mauricio Gugelmin United Kingdom Leyton House Racing Leyton House CG911 Ilmor LH10 V10 3.5 G
16 Austria Karl Wendlinger United Kingdom Leyton House Racing Leyton House CG911 Ilmor LH10 V10 3.5 G
19 Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Camel Benetton Ford Benetton B191 Ford Cosworth HB V8 3.5 P
20 Brazil Nelson Piquet United Kingdom Camel Benetton Ford Benetton B191 Ford Cosworth HB V8 3.5 P
21 Italy Emanuele Pirro Italy BMS Scuderia Italia Dallara BMS-191 Judd GV V10 3.5 P
22 Finland JJ Lehto Italy BMS Scuderia Italia Dallara BMS-191 Judd GV V10 3.5 P
23 Italy Pierluigi Martini Italy Minardi Team Minardi M191 Ferrari F1-91 V12 3.5 G
24 Italy Gianni Morbidelli Italy Minardi Team Minardi M191 Ferrari F1-91 V12 3.5 G
25 Belgium Thierry Boutsen France Ligier Gitanes Ligier JS35 Lamborghini L3512 V12 3.5 G
26 France Érik Comas France Ligier Gitanes Ligier JS35 Lamborghini L3512 V12 3.5 G
27 France Alain Prost Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA Ferrari 643 Ferrari F1-91 V12 3.5 G
28 France Jean Alesi Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA Ferrari 643 Ferrari F1-91 V12 3.5 G
29 France Éric Bernard France Larrousse F1 Lola 91 Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
30 Japan Aguri Suzuki France Larrousse F1 Lola 91 Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
31 Japan Naoki Hattori Italy Coloni Racing Srl Coloni C4 Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
32 Italy Alex Zanardi Ireland Team 7Up Jordan Jordan 191 Ford Cosworth HB V8 3.5 G
33 Italy Andrea de Cesaris Ireland Team 7Up Jordan Jordan 191 Ford Cosworth HB V8 3.5 G
34 Italy Nicola Larini Italy Modena Team SpA Lambo 291 Lamborghini L3512 V12 3.5 G
35 Belgium Eric van de Poele Italy Modena Team SpA Lambo 291 Lamborghini L3512 V12 3.5 G

Practice OverviewEdit

Practice saw several drivers exploring the limits of the circuit, and was heavily affected by an early rain shower.[2] Pierluigi Martini smashed his Minardi up badly enough to bring out a red flag early on, before Gabriele Tarquini managed to write off his new Fondmetal just moments after the restart.[2] But the biggest accident in practice was also the scariest, as Eric Bernard in his Lola crashed heavily after 130R, breaking his leg in the process.[2] Bernard was helicoptered to hospital, leaving Larousse with only one car for the weekend.[2]

QualifyingEdit

As with the majority of the 1991 season, the 1991 Japanese Grand Prix saw the use of pre-qualifying to satisfy the FIA's latest safety drive.[1] The maximum limit for cars on any circuit at any time had been set at 30, meaning that 3 cars had to be removed from the weekend running. Seven drivers were therefore made to battle it out for four spots in the full qualifying session, based on their performance from the previous half season. Brabham, Coloni, Fondmetal, and Footwork were the entrants who made up the session after the 1991 German Grand Prix, with AGS out for the foreseeable future.

Pre-QualifyingEdit

With Brabham once again favourites to top the session, there was little surprise when Martin Brundle topped the times from the session, beating the two Footworks by over a second.[3] But, there was a shock for the British team, as Mark Blundell failed to qualify after struggling to set his car up to a level of parity with Brundle.[3] He joined debutante Naoki Hattori on the sidelines for the rest of the weekend, with the Japanese journalist well off the pace.[3]

ReportEdit

Like practice, the two qualifying sessions were littered with accidents, with two heavy crashes denting the chances of two drivers.[2] The first hit youngser Michael Schumacher, who was able to walk away from his Benetton after losing the rear end into the complex and hitting the barrier backwards.[2] Then, it was Jean Alesi's turn, as he mirrored Schumacher's accident through the complex, destroying the rear of the Ferrari and his hopes of a podium.[2] Fortunately for both, they could use the spare cars, and eventually ended up ninth and sixth respectively.

Away from the carnage, and Ayrton Senna had almost the perfect result from the session, as his team mate Gerhard Berger claimed pole.[2] Doubtless, the Brazilian would have wanted the position himself, but he did take second, which meant he could control Nigel Mansell from the start, with the Brit taking third.[2] Alain Prost managed to beat the second Williams of Riccardo Patrese to fourth, with Pierluigi Martini, Gianni Morbidelli and Nelson Piquet all in the top ten.[2]

Best of the pre-qualifiers was Brundle, although he was down in seventeenth, with Alex Caffi joining him on the grid, although he was down in 26th, with Tarquini splitting them in 24th. THe latter two were outqualified by F1 newbie Karl Wendlinger, who claimed 22nd, as Michele Alboreto, Nicola Larini and Eric van de Poele all failed to make it through. Éric Bernard, of course, would take no further part in the weekend after his accident.

Full Qualifying ResultsEdit

The final result for the 1991 Japanese Grand Prix is outlined below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Time[3] Gap
Q1 Q2
1 2 Austria Gerhard Berger McLaren-Honda 1:36.458 1:34.700
2 1 Brazil Ayrton Senna McLaren-Honda 1:36.490 1:34.898 +0.198s
3 5 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell Williams-Renault 1:36.529 1:34.922 +0.222s
4 27 France Alain Prost Ferrari 1:37.565 1:36.670 +1.970s
5 6 Italy Riccardo Patrese Williams-Renault 1:37.874 1:36.882 +2.182s
6 28 France Jean Alesi Ferrari 1:37.718 1:37.140 +2.740s
7 23 Italy Pierluigi Martini Minardi-Ferrari 1:40.176 1:38.154 +3.454s
8 24 Italy Gianni Morbidelli Minardi-Ferrari 1:41.088 1:38.248 +3.548s
9 19 Germany Michael Schumacher Benetton-Ford Cosworth 1:39.742 1:38.363 +3.663s
10 20 Brazil Nelson Piquet Benetton-Ford Cosworth 1:40.557 1:38.614 +3.914s
11 33 Italy Andrea de Cesaris Jordan-Ford Cosworth 1:40.407 1:38.842 +4.142s
12 22 Finland JJ Lehto Dallara-Judd 1:40.191 1:38.911 +4.211s
13 32 Italy Alex Zanardi Jordan-Ford Cosworth 1:39.051 1:38.923 +4.223s
14 4 Italy Stefano Modena Tyrrell-Honda 1:39.245 1:38.926 +4.226s
15 3 Japan Satoru Nakajima Tyrrell-Honda 1:40.100 1:39.118 +4.418s
16 21 Italy Emanuele Pirro Dallara-Judd 1:41.246 1:39.238 +4.538s
17 25 Belgium Thierry Boutsen Ligier-Lamborghini 1:39.946 1:39.499 +4.799s
18 15 Brazil Mauricio Gugelmin Leyton House-Ilmor 1:40.714 1:39.518 +4.818s
19 7 United Kingdom Martin Brundle Brabham-Yamaha 1:40.867 1:39.697 +4.997s
20 26 France Érik Comas Ligier-Lamborghini 1:41.251 1:39.820 +5.120s
21 11 Finland Mika Häkkinen Lotus-Judd 1:41.484 1:40.024 +5.324s
22 16 Austria Karl Wendlinger Leyton House-Ilmor 1:41.639 1:40.092 +5.392s
23 12 United Kingdom Johnny Herbert Lotus-Judd 1:40.512 1:40.170 +5.470s
24 14 Italy Gabriele Tarquini Fondmetal-Ford Cosworth 1:42.835 1:40.184 +5.484s
25 30 Japan Aguri Suzuki Lola-Ford Cosworth 1:41.528 1:40.255 +5.555s
26 10 Italy Alex Caffi Footwork-Ford Cosworth 1:40.517 1:40.402 +5.702s
DNQ 9 Italy Michele Alboreto Footwork-Ford Cosworth 1:41.536 1:40.844 +6.144s
DNQ 34 Italy Nicola Larini Lambo-Lamborghini 1:43.057 1:42.492 +7.792s
DNQ 35 Belgium Eric van de Poele Lambo-Lamborghini 1:46.641 1:42.724 +8.024s
DNQ 29 France Éric Bernard Lola-Ford Cosworth No Time
DNPQ 8 United Kingdom Mark Blundell Brabham-Yamaha 1:44.025
DNPQ 31 Japan Naoki Hattori Coloni-Ford Cosworth 2:00.035

GridEdit

The full starting grid for the 1991 Japanese Grand Prix is shown below:

Pos Pos
Driver Driver
______________
Row 1 1 ______________
Gerhard Berger 2
______________ Ayrton Senna
Row 2 3 ______________
Nigel Mansell 4
______________ Alain Prost
Row 3 5 ______________
Riccardo Patrese 6
______________ Jean Alesi
Row 4 7 ______________
Pierluigi Martini 8
______________ Gianni Morbidelli
Row 5 9 ______________
Michael Schumacher 10
______________ Nelson Piquet
Row 6 11 ______________
Andrea de Cesaris 12
______________ JJ Lehto
Row 7 13 ______________
Alex Zanardi 14
______________ Stefano Modena
Row 8 15 ______________
Satoru Nakajima 16
______________ Emanuele Pirro
Row 9 17 ______________
Thierry Boutsen 18
______________ Mauricio Gugelmin
Row 10 19 ______________
Martin Brundle 20
______________ Érik Comas
Row 11 21 ______________
Mika Häkkinen 22
______________ Karl Wendlinger
Row 12 23 ______________
Johnny Herbert 24
______________ Gabriele Tarquini
Row 13 25 ______________
Aguri Suzuki 26
______________ Alex Caffi

RaceEdit

Despite the rain during the earlier part of the weekend, Sunday was dry and warm, just what Nigel Mansell needed to be able to defeat the two McLarens, after the Williams struggled in the wet in Spain.[2] All Ayrton Senna needed to do was to keep ahead of Mansell, and, with the Brazilian starting behind team mate Gerhard Berger, he could allow the Austrian to build a big lead, meaning Mansell would have to push hard to win, even if he got past Senna.[2] Reliability would doubtless play a factor, although that ball was firmly in Senna's court, with his McLaren MP4/6 one of the most reliable cars on the grid.

ReportEdit

Off the line, it was formation flying from the two McLarens, who managed to box Mansell on the outside of the track, as Berger swept into the lead from Senna.[2] Riccardo Patrese beat Alain Prost off the grid to take fourth, with the Frenchman just able to keep team mate Jean Alesi at bay through turn one. Alesi, however, would only complete a third of the opening lap, however, as he suffered an engine failure in the first part of the complex.[2] Back with the leaders, and Senna was already backing off from Berger to hold up Mansell, while the Austrian began to build a lead at the front.[2]

The second lap saw a four car pile up on the spot where Alesi blew his engine, as the oil laid down from the former Ferrari engine caught out Andrea de Cesaris.[1] He spun on the oil, leading JJ Lehto, running just behind him, to slam on the brakes to take avoiding action.[1] The sudden momentum change caught out Lehto's team mate Emanuele Pirro, who slammed into the back of his team mate's Dallara, putting both out of the race.[2] Then, as de Cesaris rejoined, he was collected by the débutante Karl Wendlinger, with the pair both ending up in the gravel trap next two the two Dallaras, all four out.[1]

Mansell, meanwhile, was crawling all over the back of Senna, who was now putting up a stubborn, and time consuming defence.[2] Mansell began to make increasingly riskier moves to try to get past, opting to brake later and later into turn one. This would ultimately prove to be his down fall, when, on lap 10, Mansell carried too much speed through turn one and caught the grass.[2] Momentum carried him into the gravel, with the Brit then thrown into a spin, then ended with the Williams beached and Mansell out of the title fight.[2]

Berger slowed afterwards, with the two McLarens trying some formation flying after Berger waved Senna through, a perfect display for engine supplier Honda at their home race.[2] Although the title and the race seemed decided, however, the race was anything but tame further down. Martin Brundle had made a strong start in the Yamaha powered Brabham, and was now battling Pierluigi Martini and Michael Schumacher for fifth.[2] Unfortunately, reliability prevented the fight getting into full swing, as first Schumacher then Martini retired, promoting Brundle.[2]

Ultimately though, the action was overshadowed by one last gesture by Senna, who pulled aside on the run out of the chicane on the last lap to allow Berger to take victory, a thank you for the work that Berger had done.[2] Riccardo Patrese, meanwhile, had finished third after being unable to compete with McLaren's stunning pace, while Prost claimed fourth for Ferrari.[2] Brundle collected his first points for Brabham in 1991 at Yamaha's home race, while Stefano Modena was promoted to sixth in the closing stages in the Tyrrell-Honda.[2]

Controversy, however, was never too far away from Senna, and although he had won the title with only minor incidents throughout the season he let his words speak louder than his actions.[1] In his post race interview, Senna highlighted the politics of the now former Jean-Marie Balestre era as having been detrimental to the Championship, and that 1991, which had seen Max Mosley elected as FISA president, was a good season for the Championship.[2]

ResultsEdit

The final results for the 1991 Japanese Grand Prix are shown below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 2 Austria Gerhard Berger McLaren-Honda 53 1:32:10.695 1 10
2 1 Brazil Ayrton Senna McLaren-Honda 53 +0.344s 2 6
3 6 Italy Riccardo Patrese Williams-Renault 53 +56.731s 5 4
4 27 France Alain Prost Ferrari 53 +1:20.761 4 3
5 7 United Kingdom Martin Brundle Brabham-Yamaha 52 +1 lap 19 2
6 4 Italy Stefano Modena Tyrrell-Honda 52 +1 lap 14 1
7 20 Brazil Nelson Piquet Benetton-Ford Cosworth 52 +1 lap 10
8 15 Brazil Mauricio Gugelmin Leyton House-Ilmor 52 +1 lap 18
9 25 Belgium Thierry Boutsen Ligier-Lamborghini 52 +1 lap 17
10 10 Italy Alex Caffi Footwork-Ford Cosworth 51 +2 laps 26
11 14 Italy Gabriele Tarquini Fondmetal-Ford Cosworth 50 +3 laps 24
Ret 26 France Érik Comas Ligier-Lamborghini 41 Alternator 20
Ret 23 Italy Pierluigi Martini Minardi-Ferrari 39 Clutch 7
Ret 19 Germany Michael Schumacher Benetton-Ford Cosworth 34 Engine 9
Ret 12 United Kingdom Johnny Herbert Lotus-Judd 31 Engine 23
Ret 3 Japan Satoru Nakajima Tyrrell-Honda 30 Spin 15
Ret 30 Japan Aguri Suzuki Lola-Ford Cosworth 26 Engine 25
Ret 24 Italy Gianni Morbidelli Minardi-Ferrari 15 Wheel bearing 8
Ret 5 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell Williams-Renault 9 Spin 3
Ret 32 Italy Alex Zanardi Jordan-Ford Cosworth 7 Gearbox 13
Ret 11 Finland Mika Häkkinen Lotus-Judd 4 Engine 21
Ret 33 Italy Andrea de Cesaris Jordan-Ford Cosworth 1 Accident 11
Ret 22 Finland JJ Lehto Dallara-Judd 1 Accident 12
Ret 21 Italy Emanuele Pirro Dallara-Judd 1 Accident 16
Ret 16 Austria Karl Wendlinger Leyton House-Ilmor 1 Accident 22
Ret 28 France Jean Alesi Ferrari 0 Engine 6
DNQ 9 Italy Michele Alboreto Footwork-Ford Cosworth
DNQ 34 Italy Nicola Larini Lambo-Lamborghini
DNQ 35 Belgium Eric van de Poele Lambo-Lamborghini
DNQ 29 France Éric Bernard Lola-Ford Cosworth
DNPQ 8 United Kingdom Mark Blundell Brabham-Yamaha
DNPQ 31 Japan Naoki Hattori Coloni-Ford Cosworth
Source

MilestonesEdit

StandingsEdit

Ayrton Senna therefore claimed his third World Championship, with a 26 point advantage over Nigel Mansell, and only 10 available in Adelaide, the final race of the season. Mansell would therefore have to be content with second, in a season where misfortune had cost him another chance at a first title, with Riccardo Patrese confirmed as taking third. Gerhard Berger claimed fourth from Alain Prost, although he remained under threat from the Frenchman, who could still finish in the top four if he won in Australia.

The Constructors' Championship duel between McLaren-Honda and Williams-Renault was set to go down to the final race, although it was weighed heavily in the former's favour. They overturned Williams' one point lead coming into Japan, leaving with an eleven point advantage over their native rivals. Ferrari, meanwhile, were confirmed in third, after a poor season that looked set to end without a win to their name, with Benetton secure in fourth. Jordan Grand Prix, meanwhile, had a fight on their hands to keep their fifth place status, as Tyrrell slowly closed the gap. 

Drivers' World Championship
Pos. Driver Pts +/-
1 Brazil Ayrton Senna 91
2 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell 69
3 Italy Riccardo Patrese 52
4 Austria Gerhard Berger 41 ▲1
5 France Alain Prost 34 ▼1
6 Brazil Nelson Piquet 25
7 France Jean Alesi 21
8 Italy Stefano Modena 10
9 Italy Andrea de Cesaris 9
10 Brazil Roberto Moreno 8
11 Italy Pierluigi Martini 6
12 Finland JJ Lehto 4
13 Belgium Bertrand Gachot 4
14 Germany Michael Schumacher 4
15 Japan Satoru Nakajima 2
16 Finland Mika Häkkinen 2
17 United Kingdom Martin Brundle 2 ▲6
18 Italy Emanuele Pirro 1 ▼1
19 United Kingdom Mark Blundell 1 ▼1
20 Italy Ivan Capelli 1 ▼1
21 France Éric Bernard 1 ▼1
22 Japan Aguri Suzuki 1 ▼1
23 United Kingdom Julian Bailey 1 ▼1
Constructors' World Championship
Pos. Team Pts +/-
1 United Kingdom McLaren-Honda 132 ▲1
2 United Kingdom Williams-Renault 121 ▼1
3 Italy Ferrari 55
4 United Kingdom Benetton-Ford Cosworth 37
5 Ireland Jordan-Ford Cosworth 13
6 United Kingdom Tyrrell-Honda 12
7 Italy Minardi-Ferrari 6
8 Italy Dallara-Judd 5
9 United Kingdom Lotus-Judd 3
10 United Kingdom Brabham-Yamaha 3 ▲2
11 United Kingdom Lola-Ford Cosworth 2 ▼1
12 United Kingdom Leyton House-Ilmor 1 ▼1

ReferencesEdit

Videos and Images:

References:

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: JAPANESE GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr515.html, (Accessed 17/08/2015)
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 2.19 2.20 2.21 2.22 2.23 2.24 2.25 PhantomSMA, 'Formula 1 Grand Prix: 1991 Season Review - Part 15 - Race Fifteen: Japan', youtube.com, (YouTube, 14/04/2013), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aohke_tnwgU, (Accessed 17/08/2015)
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 '1991 Japanese Grand Prix', wikipedia.org, (WikiMedia, 13/08/2015), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1991_Japanese_Grand_Prix, (Accessed 15/08/2015)
v·d·e Nominate this page for Featured Article
V T E 1991 Formula One Season
Teams McLaren • Tyrrell • Williams • Brabham • Footwork • Lotus • Fondmetal • Leyton House • AGS • Benetton • Dallara • Minardi • Ligier • Ferrari • Lola • Coloni • Jordan • Lambo
Engines Ferrari • Ford • Honda • Ilmor • Judd • Lamborghini • Porsche • Renault • Yamaha
Drivers Senna • 2 Berger • 3 Nakajima • 4 Modena • 5 Mansell • 6 Patrese • 7 Brundle • 8 Blundell • 9 Alboreto • 10 Caffi • 10 Johansson • 11 Häkkinen • 12 Bailey • 12 Herbert • 12 Bartels • 14 Grouillard • 14 Tarquini • 15 Gugelmin • 16 Capelli • 16 Wendlinger • 17 Tarquini • 17 Grouillard • 18 Johansson • 18 Barbazza • 19 Moreno • 19 Schumacher • 20 Piquet • 21 Pirro • 22 Lehto • 23 Martini • 24 Morbidelli • 24 Moreno • 25 Boutsen • 26 Comas • 27 Prost • 27 Morbidelli • 28 Alesi • 29 Bernard • 29 Gachot • 30 Suzuki • 31 Chaves • 31 Hattori • 32 Gachot • 32 Schumacher • 32 Moreno • 32 Zanardi • 33 De Cesaris • 34 Larini • 35 Van de Poele
Other Drivers McNish
Cars McLaren MP4/6 • Williams FW14 • Ferrari 642 • Ferrari 643 • Benetton B190B • Benetton B191 • Jordan 191 • Tyrrell 020 • Minardi M191 • Dallara 191 • Lotus 102B • Brabham BT60Y • Lola LC91 • Leyton House CG911 • Ligier JS35 • Lambo 291 • AGS JH25 • AGS JH25B • AGS JH27 • Fondmetal FA1M-E • Fondmetal Fomet-1 • Footwork FA12 • Footwork A11C • Coloni C4
Tyres Goodyear • Pirelli
Races United States • Brazil • San Marino • Monaco • Canada • Mexico • France • Britain • Germany • Hungary • Belgium • Italy • Portugal • Spain • Japan • Australia
See also 1990 Formula One Season • 1992 Formula One Season • Category
Japan Japanese Grand Prix
Circuits Fuji (1976–1977, 2007–2008), Suzuka (1987–2006, 2009–present)
SuzukaCircuit2005
Races 197619771978–1986 • 19871988198919901991199219931994 • 19951996199719981999200020012002200320042005200620072008200920102011201220132014201520162017

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