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 The 1991 Italian Grand Prix was the twelfth round of the 1991 Formula One Championship, held at one of the homes of the Championship, Monza.[1] The build up to the race had been one filled with controversy involving one of the sport's emerging talents, Michael Schumacher.[1]

The race itself saw Nigel Mansell defeat pole man Ayrton Senna in a straight fight to take victory and close the title fight between the two.[1] Alain Prost completed the podium, while the man in the centre of the legal battles, Schumacher, claimed points in only his second race, beating new team mate, and triple World Champion, Nelson Piquet in the process.[1]

BackgroundEdit

Dominating the build up to the Italian Grand Prix of 1991 was a legal battle over the most promising talent of the 1990s, Michael Schumacher.[1] Jordan had optained the services of the young German in Belgium, after pocketing a £200,000 deal from Mercedes-Benz and left the issue at that, believing that they had a contract with him to the end of the season.[1] Benetton, meanwhile, cancelled Roberto Moreno's contract and signed Schumacher, after his management team had spoken to representatives from Benetton.[1] The legal furore that resulted cost money and time for both parties, and ended up with Benetton and Schumacher's reputations taking a battering.[1] Moreno, meanwhile, took up the vacant seat at Jordan, and was fired up to try to prove his former employers wrong.

At Team Lotus, a minor change to their driver line up saw Michael Bartels return once again, as Johnny Herbert had to jet off to fulfil more of his Formula 3000 commitments in Japan.[1] Ferrari, meanwhile, were throwing a large amount of resources to ensure that their cars were competitive at their home race, as the tifosi gathered to support their champions in Monza.[2]

On the topic of Champions, Ayrton Senna looked well on his way to taking a third World Title, now holding a 22 point lead over Nigel Mansell, with 50 left to fight for. Riccardo Patrese, in third, was a huge outsider for the title, with only a major run of misfortune for Senna able to hand him a chance of the title. Gerhard Berger was left in fourth, attempting to held Senna as he had done last season, with Nelson Piquet and Alain Prost locked together in a battle for fifth.

The Constructors Championship was also a struggle of two titans, as Williams-Renault and McLaren-Honda went to battle once again. McLaren led the way, one point short of the 100 barrier, with Williams in second trailing by 26 points, before a considerable gap to Ferrari in third. Indeed, the Italian team were more in threat from falling behind Benetton, who looked likely to mount a late challenge for the top three. Jordan completed the top five, with lead driver Andrea de Cesaris hoping to help Moreno and his team overhaul the Benetton team above them.

Entry ListEdit

The full entry list for the 1991 Italian Grand Prix is shown below:

No. Driver Entrant Constructor Chassis Engine Model Tyre
1 Brazil Ayrton Senna United Kingdom Honda Marlboro McLaren McLaren MP4/6 Honda RA121E V10 3.5 G
2 Austria Gerhard Berger United Kingdom Honda Marlboro McLaren McLaren MP4/6 Honda RA121E V10 3.5 G
3 Japan Satoru Nakajima United Kingdom Braun Tyrrell Honda Tyrrell 020 Honda RA101E V10 3.5 P
4 Italy Stefano Modena United Kingdom Braun Tyrrell Honda Tyrrell 020 Honda RA101E V10 3.5 P
5 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell United Kingdom Canon Williams Team Williams FW14 Renault RS3 V10 3.5 G
6 Italy Riccardo Patrese United Kingdom Canon Williams Team Williams FW14 Renault RS3 V10 3.5 G
7 United Kingdom Martin Brundle United Kingdom Motor Racing Developments Ltd. Brabham BT60Y Yamaha OX99 V12 3.5 P
8 United Kingdom Mark Blundell United Kingdom Motor Racing Developments Ltd. Brabham BT60Y Yamaha OX99 V12 3.5 P
9 Italy Michele Alboreto United Kingdom Footwork Grand Prix International Footwork A12 Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
10 Italy Alex Caffi United Kingdom Footwork Grand Prix International Footwork A12 Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
11 Finland Mika Häkkinen United Kingdom Team Lotus Lotus 102B Judd EV V8 3.5 G
12 Germany Michael Bartels United Kingdom Team Lotus Lotus 102B Judd EV V8 3.5 G
14 France Olivier Grouillard Italy Fondmetal F1 SpA Fondmetal FA1 M-E Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
15 Brazil Mauricio Gugelmin United Kingdom Leyton House Racing Leyton House CG911 Ilmor LH10 V10 3.5 G
16 Italy Ivan Capelli United Kingdom Leyton House Racing Leyton House CG911 Ilmor LH10 V10 3.5 G
17 Italy Gabriele Tarquini FranceAutomobiles Gonfaronnaises Sportives AGS JH25B Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
18 Italy Fabrizio Barbazza FranceAutomobiles Gonfaronnaises Sportives AGS JH25B Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
19 Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Camel Benetton Ford Benetton B191 Ford Cosworth HB V8 3.5 P
20 Brazil Nelson Piquet United Kingdom Camel Benetton Ford Benetton B191 Ford Cosworth HB V8 3.5 P
21 Italy Emanuele Pirro Italy BMS Scuderia Italia Dallara BMS-191 Judd GV V10 3.5 P
22 Finland JJ Lehto Italy BMS Scuderia Italia Dallara BMS-191 Judd GV V10 3.5 P
23 Italy Pierluigi Martini Italy Minardi Team Minardi M191 Ferrari F1-91 V12 3.5 G
24 Italy Gianni Morbidelli Italy Minardi Team Minardi M191 Ferrari F1-91 V12 3.5 G
25 Belgium Thierry Boutsen France Ligier Gitanes Ligier JS35 Lamborghini L3512 V12 3.5 G
26 France Érik Comas France Ligier Gitanes Ligier JS35 Lamborghini L3512 V12 3.5 G
27 France Alain Prost Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA Ferrari 643 Ferrari F1-91 V12 3.5 G
28 France Jean Alesi Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA Ferrari 643 Ferrari F1-91 V12 3.5 G
29 France Éric Bernard France Larrousse F1 Lola 91 Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
30 Japan Aguri Suzuki France Larrousse F1 Lola 91 Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
31 Portugal Pedro Chaves Italy Coloni Racing Srl Coloni C4 Ford Cosworth DFR V8 3.5 G
32 Brazil Roberto Moreno Ireland Team 7Up Jordan Jordan 191 Ford Cosworth HB V8 3.5 G
33 Italy Andrea de Cesaris Ireland Team 7Up Jordan Jordan 191 Ford Cosworth HB V8 3.5 G
34 Italy Nicola Larini Italy Modena Team SpA Lambo 291 Lamborghini L3512 V12 3.5 G
35 Belgium Eric van de Poele Italy Modena Team SpA Lambo 291 Lamborghini L3512 V12 3.5 G

Practice OverviewEdit

QualifyingEdit

As with the majority of the 1991 season, the 1991 Italian Grand Prix saw the use of pre-qualifying to satisfy the FIA's latest safety drive.[1] The maximum limit for cars on any circuit at any time had been set at 30, meaning that 4 cars had to be removed from the weekend running. Eight drivers were therefore made to battle it out for four spots in the full qualifying session, based on their performance from the previous half season.

Pre-qualifyingEdit

Brabham continued their domination of the session that they had been thrown into in Germany, as Mark Blundell beat Martin Brundle to top the times. Olivier Grouillard made it through for the second consecutive race, joined by Michele Alboreto.[3] Alboreto made the cut by over one and a half seconds, as the two AGS entries joined Alex Caffi and Pedro Chaves on the sidelines.

ReportEdit

Ayrton Senna was on pole once again, as Nigel Mansell bemoaned two troubled laps as he claimed second. The Brit had caught traffic on both of his quick laps, encountering both McLaren-Hondas and Alain Prost on the run to Ascari, meaning he lost the tenth and a half that Senna beat him by.[1] The top four was completed by Gerhard Berger and Riccardo Patrese (with the quartet only separated by 0.250th of a second), with the two Ferraris next up.[1]

Michael Schumacher claimed seventh for a second race in a row, beating team mate Nelson Piquet, while Roberto Moreno claimed ninth for Jordan, hoping to beat his former employers.[1] Out went Michael Bartels, Aguri Suzuki and Eric van de Poele, while Alboreto was the only one of the pre-qualifiers who failed to qualify.

Full Qualifying ResultsEdit

The final result for the 1991 Italian Grand Prix is outlined below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Time[3] Gap
Q1 Q2
1 1 Brazil Ayrton Senna McLaren-Honda 1:21.114 1:21.245
2 5 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell Williams-Renault 1:21.328 1:21.247 +0.133s
3 2 Austria Gerhard Berger McLaren-Honda 1:21.360 1:21.346 +0.232s
4 6 Italy Riccardo Patrese Williams-Renault 1:21.619 1:21.372 +0.258s
5 27 France Alain Prost Ferrari 1:22.080 1:21.825 +0.711s
6 28 France Jean Alesi Ferrari 1:21.956 1:21.890 +0.776s
7 19 Germany Michael Schumacher Benetton-Ford Cosworth 1:22.471 1:22.553 +1.357s
8 20 Brazil Nelson Piquet Benetton-Ford Cosworth 1:23.176 1:22.726 +1.612s
9 32 Brazil Roberto Moreno Jordan-Ford Cosworth 1:23.102 1:23.447 +1.988s
10 23 Italy Pierluigi Martini Minardi-Ferrari 1:23.294 1:23.789 +2.180s
11 8 United Kingdom Mark Blundell Brabham-Yamaha 1:23.473 1:24.400 +2.359s
12 16 Italy Ivan Capelli Leyton House-Ilmor 1:23.674 1:24.755 +2.560s
13 4 Italy Stefano Modena Tyrrell-Honda 1:24.457 1:23.701 +2.587s
14 33 Italy Andrea de Cesaris Jordan-Ford Cosworth 1:24.060 1:23.921 +2.807s
15 3 Japan Satoru Nakajima Tyrrell-Honda 1:24.464 1:24.265 +3.151s
16 21 Italy Emanuele Pirro Dallara-Judd 1:25.584 1:24.282 +3.168s
17 24 Italy Gianni Morbidelli Minardi-Ferrari 1:24.287 1:25.223 +3.173s
18 15 Brazil Mauricio Gugelmin Leyton House-Ilmor 1:24.391 1:25.023 +3.277s
19 7 United Kingdom Martin Brundle Brabham-Yamaha 1:24.713 1:24.643 +3.529s
20 22 Finland JJ Lehto Dallara-Judd 1:24.733 1:24.725 +3.611s
21 25 Belgium Thierry Boutsen Ligier-Lamborghini 1:26.133 1:25.177 +4.063s
22 26 France Template:Eric Comas Ligier-Lamborghini 1:25.478 1:25.420 +4.306s
23 34 Italy Nicola Larini Lambo-Lamborghini 1:25.717 1:25.934 +4.603s
24 29 France Éric Bernard Lola-Ford Cosworth 1:26.325 1:25.871 +4.757s
25 11 Finland Mika Häkkinen Lotus-Judd 1:26.701 1:25.941 +4.827s
26 14 France Olivier Grouillard Fondmetal-Ford Cosworth 1:26.416 1:26.805 +5.302s
DNQ 9 Italy Michele Alboreto Footwork-Ford Cosworth 1:26.563 1:27.198 +5.449s
DNQ 12 Germany Michael Bartels Lotus-Judd 1:27.169 1:26.829 +5.715s
DNQ 35 Belgium Eric van de Poele Lambo-Lamborghini 1:27.110 1:27.099 +5.985s
DNQ 30 Japan Aguri Suzuki Lola-Ford Cosworth 1:27.257 No Time +6.143s
DNPQ 18 Italy Fabrizio Barbazza AGS-Cosworth 1:27.392
DNPQ 17 Italy Gabriele Tarquini AGS-Cosworth 1:27.401
DNPQ 10 Italy Alex Caffi Footwork-Ford Cosworth 1:27.608
DNPQ 31 Portugal Pedro Chaves Coloni-Ford Cosworth No Time

GridEdit

The complete starting grid for the 1991 Italian Grand Prix is outlined below:

Pos Pos
Driver Driver
______________
Row 1 1 ______________
Ayrton Senna 2
______________ Nigel Mansell
Row 2 3 ______________
Gerhard Berger 4
______________ Riccardo Patrese
Row 3 5 ______________
Alain Prost 6
______________ Jean Alesi
Row 4 7 ______________
Michael Schumacher 8
______________ Nelson Piquet
Row 5 9 ______________
Roberto Moreno 10
______________ Pierluigi Martini
Row 6 11 ______________
Mark Blundell 12
______________ Ivan Capelli
Row 7 13 ______________
Stefano Modena 14
______________ Andrea de Cesaris
Row 8 15 ______________
Satoru Nakajima 16
______________ Emanuele Pirro
Row 9 17 ______________
Gianni Morbidelli 18
______________ Mauricio Gugelmin
Row 10 19 ______________
Martin Brundle 20
______________ JJ Lehto
Row 11 21 ______________
Thierry Boutsen 22
______________ Érik Comas
Row 12 23 ______________
Nicola Larini 24
______________ Éric Bernard
Row 13 25 ______________
Mika Häkkinen 26
______________ Olivier Grouillard

RaceEdit

A dry afternoon emerged on Sunday, with Nigel Mansell and Ayrton Senna set to do battle, although it must be noted that Senna had been undefeated in 1991 when he had started from pole. With McLaren-Honda and Williams-Renault seemingly on a level playing field, and well ahead of the rest, the winner was likely to come from that quartet, leaving the rest of the field to fight for the minor points.[1]

ReportEdit

The top four held station off the line, as Senna hooked up a great start to take a comfortable lead, ahead of Jean Alesi, who beat team mate Alain Prost off the grid.[2] Michael Schumacher was challenging the two Ferraris from seventh, making it further round the opening lap than he had in Belgium, with Nelson Piquet and Pierluigi Martini battling away, Roberto Moreno having slipped down.[2] The field made it through the first lap without incident, although that record was not to last.

Jean Alesi managed to get up the inside of Riccardo Patrese down into the Rettifilo at the start of the second lap, braking a fraction later than the Italian.[2] Unfortunately for the Sicilian, he locked his brakes on the dust, and slid into the gravel on the outside of the chicane, bouncing back onto the circuit and dragging all manner of debris with him.[2] Patrese and Prost went past, with Alesi recovering fast enough to fend off Schumacher, although Alesi was in the pits for a damage examination at the end of the lap.[2]

The next incident saw Martin Brundle bouncing across the gravel, before Roberto Moreno lost the back of his new Jordan into Ascari, ending his awful week in a gravel pit.[2] Back at the front, Gerhard Berger made a mistake exiting the Rettifilo, allowing Patrese to dart around him to take third, leaving Berger to fend off Prost for the rest of the lap.[2] Schumacher was staying with the leaders, challenging Prost into the Lesmo bends and allowing Berger to gain a small advantage, as Mansell began to close onto the back of Senna.

Patrese began to fight Mansell for second on lap seven, as Mansell gave himself some breathing room to cool his engine.[2] That prompted the Brit to attack again, and as they made their way through the Parabolica at the end of the lap, he was right on Senna's tail.[2] The Brazilian used the slipstream of a back marker, Mauricio Gugelmin, to his advantage down the straight, which gave him just enough speed to fend off the Williams and get him alongside Gugelmin into the first corner.[2] Gugelmin then dived into the gravel, seemingly scared off by the charging trio, just about managing to keep his car moving in order to escape.[2]

Mansell and Patrese switched places a lap later, which would allow the Italian to challenge Senna, and then him to get past if he could do so.[2] Patrese was straight onto the back of Senna, challenging at every opportunity, climbing over curbs to try to get past, even using the smoke produced by Éric Bernard's engine failure to disguise a move into Rettifilo.[2] The Italian then managed to set up Senna through the Lesmo corners, and using the tow and a good exit, pulled alongside the Brazilian as they approached Ascari.[2] Confidently, Patrese dived on the brakes a fraction after Senna, and grabbed the lead of the Italian Grand Prix on lap 26.[2]

Yet, a lap later, and Patrese through it away, running wide on the exit of Ascari and throwing his car into a spin, and allowing Senna and Mansell back through.[2] Berger and Prost were now on his tail, with the trio in tight battle down to the Parabolica, although Patrese remained ahead.[1] A gearbox failure then ended Patrese's day, promoting Berger and Prost, while also opening a significant gap to Senna and Mansell, with the Brit throwing all the tricks in the book (and the book) at the McLaren to try to force his way past.[1]

Lap 34 saw Mansell pull an identical move to Patrese on Senna, having run nose to tail with the Brazilian since the Italian had retired.[1] Senna opted to dart into the pits at the end of the lap, with a staggeringly quick stop by McLaren putting him back on the road just 16 second behind Mansell, although he would have to fight his way back through.[2] The first man in his sights was Schumacher, who was now in a lonely fourth place, with Senna bearing down on him, until Olivier Grouillard pulled in front of the Brazilian into the Parabolica.[2] Senna waved furiously at the Frenchman down the main straight in protest at the move, before returning to the job in hand, taking the Benetton a lap later.[2]

Piquet was another man to stop, before using his fresh tyres to attack Ivan Capelli for seventh, completing the move into the Rettifilo. His next move saw him attack Andrea de Cesaris a lap later, with the Brazilian pulling an identical manoeuvre to get sixth.[2] Senna's fightback, meanwhile, was being hampered by Prost, who defended second resolutely from the McLaren, allowing Mansell to pull a huge gap.[2] Prost eventually fell with five laps to go, with Senna now having to cover a 20 second gap to the front.[2]

In the end, Mansell was able to cruise to his fourth victory of 1991, as Senna closed the gap to 16 seconds and took the fastest lap in the dying embers of the race.[2] Prost managed to keep with Senna after the Brazilian gave up hopes of winning, with Berger taking fourth, while Schumacher completed a wonderful debut for Benetton in fifth, although he may have finished higher in the Jordan he had just vacated.[2] Piquet completed the point scorers, as de Cesaris pushed him all the way to the flag, despite using heavily worn tyres, to Piquet's fresh set.[1]

ResultsEdit

The final results for the 1991 Italian Grand Prix are shown below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 5 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell Williams-Renault 53 1:17:54.319 2 10
2 1 Brazil Ayrton Senna McLaren-Honda 53 +16.292s 1 6
3 27 France Alain Prost Ferrari 53 +16.829s 5 4
4 2 Austria Gerhard Berger McLaren-Honda 53 +27.719s 3 3
5 19 Germany Michael Schumacher Benetton-Ford Cosworth 53 +34.463s 7 2
6 20 Brazil Nelson Piquet Benetton-Ford Cosworth 53 +45.600s 8 1
7 33 Italy Andrea de Cesaris Jordan-Ford Cosworth 53 +51.136s 14
8 16 Italy Ivan Capelli Leyton House-Ilmor 53 +1:15.019 12
9 24 Italy Gianni Morbidelli Minardi-Ferrari 52 +1 lap 17
10 21 Italy Emanuele Pirro Dallara-Judd 52 +1 lap 16
11 26 France Érik Comas Ligier-Lamborghini 52 +1 lap 22
12 8 United Kingdom Mark Blundell Brabham-Yamaha 52 +1 lap 11
13 7 United Kingdom Martin Brundle Brabham-Yamaha 52 +1 lap 19
14 11 Finland Mika Häkkinen Lotus-Judd 49 +4 laps 25
15 15 Brazil Mauricio Gugelmin Leyton House-Ilmor 49 +4 laps 18
16 34 Italy Nicola Larini Lambo-Lamborghini 48 +5 laps 23
Ret 14 France Olivier Grouillard Fondmetal-Ford Cosworth 46 Engine 26
Ret 22 Finland JJ Lehto Dallara-Judd 35 Overheating 20
Ret 4 Italy Stefano Modena Tyrrell-Honda 32 Engine 13
Ret 28 France Jean Alesi Ferrari 29 Engine 6
Ret 6 Italy Riccardo Patrese Williams-Renault 27 Gearbox 4
Ret 3 Japan Satoru Nakajima Tyrrell-Honda 24 Throttle 15
Ret 29 France Éric Bernard Lola-Ford Cosworth 21 Engine 24
Ret 23 Italy Pierluigi Martini Minardi-Ferrari 8 Spin 10
Ret 32 Brazil Roberto Moreno Jordan-Ford Cosworth 2 Spin 9
Ret 25 Belgium Thierry Boutsen Ligier-Lamborghini 1 Spin 21
DNQ 9 Italy Michele Alboreto Footwork-Ford Cosworth
DNQ 12 Germany Michael Bartels Lotus-Judd
DNQ 35 Belgium Eric van de Poele Lambo-Lamborghini
DNQ 30 Japan Aguri Suzuki Lola-Ford Cosworth
DNPQ 18 Italy Fabrizio Barbazza AGS-Cosworth
DNPQ 17 Italy Gabriele Tarquini AGS-Cosworth
DNPQ 10 Italy Alex Caffi Footwork-Ford Cosworth
DNPQ 31 Portugal Pedro Chaves Coloni-Ford Cosworth
Source

MilestonesEdit

StandingsEdit

Nigel Mansell managed to reduce the Championship lead, but with Ayrton Senna finishing second, the gap only closed to 18 points, with 40 left to fight for. They were now the only two capable of taking the title, mathematically as well as on ability, as Riccardo Patrese sat 44 points behind in third. He was left to try to fend off Gerhard Berger for the position, as Alain Prost and Nelson Piquet traded places once again.

McLaren-Honda smashed through the 100 point barrier although their lead over Williams-Renault was down to fifteen points. Similar to the Drivers' title, the Constructors' Championship was now a battle of two, as Ferrari had fallen 69 point behind, with only 64 available for each team. They were now fighting Benetton for their third place, as the British privateer carried renwed form with youngster Schumacher and veteran Piquet. 

Drivers' World Championship
Pos. Driver Pts +/-
1 Brazil Ayrton Senna 77
2 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell 59
3 Italy Riccardo Patrese 34
4 Austria Gerhard Berger 31
5 France Alain Prost 25 ▲1
6 Brazil Nelson Piquet 23 ▼1
7 France Jean Alesi 14
8 Italy Stefano Modena 9
9 Italy Andrea de Cesaris 9
10 Brazil Roberto Moreno 8
11 Finland JJ Lehto 4
12 Belgium Bertrand Gachot 4
13 Italy Pierluigi Martini 3
14 Japan Satoru Nakajima 2
15 Finland Mika Häkkinen 2
16 Germany Michael Schumacher 2 ▲6
17 Italy Emanuele Pirro 1 ▼1
18 United Kingdom Mark Blundell 1 ▼1
19 Italy Ivan Capelli 1 ▲3
20 France Éric Bernard 1 ▼2
21 Japan Aguri Suzuki 1 ▼2
22 United Kingdom Julian Bailey 1 ▼2
Constructors' World Championship
Pos. Team Pts +/-
1 United Kingdom McLaren-Honda 108
2 United Kingdom Williams-Renault 93
3 Italy Ferrari 39
4 United Kingdom Benetton-Ford Cosworth 33
5 Ireland Jordan-Ford Cosworth 13
6 United Kingdom Tyrrell-Honda 11
7 Italy Dallara-Judd 5
8 Italy Minardi-Ferrari 3
9 United Kingdom Lotus-Judd 3
10 United Kingdom Lola-Ford Cosworth 2
11 United Kingdom Leyton House-Ilmor 1
12 United Kingdom Brabham-Yamaha 1 ▲1

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: ITALIAN GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr512.html, (Accessed 14/08/2015)
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 2.19 2.20 2.21 2.22 2.23 2.24 'Classic F1 - Italian Grand Prix 1991 extended highlights', bbc.co.uk, (British Broadcasting Company, 08/09/2010), http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/motorsport/formula_one/8979380.stm, (Accessed 14/08/2015)
  3. 3.0 3.1 '1991 Italian Grand Prix', wikipedia.org, (WikiMedia, 13/08/2015), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1991_Italian_Grand_Prix, (Accessed 13/08/2015)
v·d·e Nominate this page for Featured Article
V T E 1991 Formula One Season
Teams McLaren • Tyrrell • Williams • Brabham • Footwork • Lotus • Fondmetal • Leyton House • AGS • Benetton • Dallara • Minardi • Ligier • Ferrari • Lola • Coloni • Jordan • Lambo
Engines Ferrari • Ford • Honda • Ilmor • Judd • Lamborghini • Porsche • Renault • Yamaha
Drivers Senna • 2 Berger • 3 Nakajima • 4 Modena • 5 Mansell • 6 Patrese • 7 Brundle • 8 Blundell • 9 Alboreto • 10 Caffi • 10 Johansson • 11 Häkkinen • 12 Bailey • 12 Herbert • 12 Bartels • 14 Grouillard • 14 Tarquini • 15 Gugelmin • 16 Capelli • 16 Wendlinger • 17 Tarquini • 17 Grouillard • 18 Johansson • 18 Barbazza • 19 Moreno • 19 Schumacher • 20 Piquet • 21 Pirro • 22 Lehto • 23 Martini • 24 Morbidelli • 24 Moreno • 25 Boutsen • 26 Comas • 27 Prost • 27 Morbidelli • 28 Alesi • 29 Bernard • 29 Gachot • 30 Suzuki • 31 Chaves • 31 Hattori • 32 Gachot • 32 Schumacher • 32 Moreno • 32 Zanardi • 33 De Cesaris • 34 Larini • 35 Van de Poele
Other Drivers McNish
Cars McLaren MP4/6 • Williams FW14 • Ferrari 642 • Ferrari 643 • Benetton B190B • Benetton B191 • Jordan 191 • Tyrrell 020 • Minardi M191 • Dallara 191 • Lotus 102B • Brabham BT60Y • Lola LC91 • Leyton House CG911 • Ligier JS35 • Lambo 291 • AGS JH25 • AGS JH25B • AGS JH27 • Fondmetal FA1M-E • Fondmetal Fomet-1 • Footwork FA12 • Footwork A11C • Coloni C4
Tyres Goodyear • Pirelli
Races United States • Brazil • San Marino • Monaco • Canada • Mexico • France • Britain • Germany • Hungary • Belgium • Italy • Portugal • Spain • Japan • Australia
See also 1990 Formula One Season • 1992 Formula One Season • Category
Italy Italian Grand Prix
Circuits Monza (1950 - 1979, 1981 - Present), Imola (1980)
Monza2000
Races 1950 • 1951 • 1952 • 1953 • 1954 • 1955 • 1956 • 1957 • 1958 • 1959 • 1960 • 1961 • 1962 • 1963 • 1964 • 1965 • 1966 • 1967 • 1968 • 1969 • 1970 • 1971 • 1972 • 1973 • 1974 • 1975 • 1976 • 1977 • 1978 • 1979 • 1980 • 1981 • 1982 • 1983 • 1984 • 1985 • 1986 • 1987 • 1988 • 1989 • 1990 • 1991 • 1992 • 1993 • 1994 • 1995 • 1996 • 1997 • 1998 • 1999 • 2000 • 2001 • 2002 • 2003 • 2004 • 2005 • 2006 • 2007 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 • 2013 • 2014 • 2015 • 2016 • 2017

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