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The 1991 Formula One Season was the 42nd edition of the Formula One World Championship, organised by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. A sixteen round calendar saw Ayrton Senna take seven wins on his way to a third World Championship, after a mid-season challenge by Nigel Mansell. McLaren-Honda won the Constructors' Championship through Senna and Gerhard Berger's efforts, although it was widely acknowledged that the Williams FW14 was the stronger car.

Senna's title came through his early form, as he won the first four races from pole while the Williams cars suffered numerous issues with their experimental semi-automatic gearboxes. Riccardo Patrese and Mansell then began a run of form to challenge the McLarens, with Mansell ultimately bettering Patrese in pace, although luck was in short supply for both. Yet, Senna remained largely untouchable, taking a further three wins to keep Mansell at bay before claiming the title with a race to spare at the 1991 Japanese Grand Prix.

It was an unusual season in weather terms too, as almost all of the race weekends were affected by rain in at least one session. This ultimately resulted in a record breaking race at the Australian Grand Prix, as a storm caused the race to stop after only fourteen laps, making it the shortest ever F1 level race. It was also one of only three times in F1 history where half points were awarded.

The race also saw the emergence of a new generation of drivers and teams, including two future World Champions. Finn Mika Häkkinen started the season at Team Lotus, and scored his first points in his third start, although numerous issues prevented him from scoring again. Jordan Grand Prix also made a name for themselves during their début year, claiming fifth place and getting involved in a legal battle over the other débuting future star, Michael Schumacher. Also joining the F1 fray were the Modena Team, who used Lamborghini built cars and engines, although they did not score any points.

The closing stages of the season also saw casualties and retirements among the old guard, most notably by Nelson Piquet, who retired with three World Championships, and 204 Grand Prix starts. AGS also withdrew their entries near the end of the season, while Satoru Nakajima called time on his career. Alain Prost, meanwhile, was fired by Ferrari for his year of complaining, and opted to take a break from F1 in 1992.

Teams and DriversEdit

Entry ListEdit

The full entry list for the 1991 Formula One Season is shown below, sorted by car number:

Constructor Chassis Tyre No. Driver Rounds Test/Reserve Drivers
Team Engine
McLaren-Honda MP4/6 G 1 Brazil Ayrton Senna All
United Kingdom Honda Marlboro McLaren Honda RA 121E 3.5 V12 2 Austria Gerhard Berger All
Tyrrell-Honda 020 P 3 Japan Satoru Nakajima All
United Kingdom Braun Tyrrell Honda Honda RA 101E 3.5 V10 4 Italy Stefano Modena All
Williams-Renault FW13B/FW14 G 5 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell All
United Kingdom Canon Williams Team Renault RS2 3.5 V10 6 Italy Riccardo Patrese All
Brabham-Yamaha BT59Y/BT60Y P 7 United Kingdom Martin Brundle All
United Kingdom Motor Racing Developments Yamaha OX99 V12 3.5 8 United Kingdom Mark Blundell All
Footwork-Porsche/Ford Cosworth A11C/FA12/FA12C G 9 Italy Michele Alboreto All
United Kingdom Footwork Grand Prix International Porsche 3512 3.5 V12
Ford Cosworth DFR 3.5 V8
10 Italy Alex Caffi 1-4, 9-16
10 Sweden Stefan Johansson 5-8
Lotus-Judd 102B G 11 Finland Mika Häkkinen All
United Kingdom Team Lotus Judd EV 3.5 V8 12 United Kingdom Julian Bailey 1-4
12 United Kingdom Johnny Herbert 5-8, 11, 13, 15-16
12 Germany Michael Bartels 9-10, 12, 14
Fondmetal-Ford Cosworth FA1M-E
Fomet-1
P 14 France Olivier Grouillard 1-13
Italy Fondmetal Ford Cosworth DFR 3.5 V8 14 Italy Gabriele Tarquini 14-16
Leyton House-Ilmor CG911 G 15 Brazil Maurício Gugelmin All
United Kingdom Leyton House Racing Ilmor 2175A 3.5 V10 16 Italy Ivan Capelli 1-14
16 Austria Karl Wendlinger 15-16
AGS-Cosworth JH25/JH25B/AGS JH27 G 17 Italy Gabriele Tarquini 1-13
France Automobiles Gonfaronnaises Sportives Ford Cosworth DFR 3.5 V8 17 France Olivier Grouillard 14
18 Sweden Stefan Johansson 1-2
18 Italy Fabrizio Barbazza 3-14
Benetton-Ford Cosworth B190B/Benetton B191 G 19 Brazil Roberto Moreno 1-11
United Kingdom Camel Benetton Ford Ford HB5 3.5 V8 19 Germany Michael Schumacher 12-16
20 Brazil Nelson Piquet All
Dallara-Judd F191 P 21 Finland JJ Lehto All
Italy BMS Scuderia Italia Judd GV 3.5 V10 22 Italy Emanuele Pirro All
Minardi-Ferrari M191 P 23 Italy Pierluigi Martini All
Italy Minardi Team Ferrari 037 3.5 V12 24 Italy Gianni Morbidelli 1-15
24 Brazil Roberto Moreno 16
Ligier-Lamborghini JS35/JS35B G 25 Belgium Thierry Boutsen All
France Equipe Ligier Gitanes Lamborghini 3512 3.5 V12 26 France Érik Comas All
Ferrari 642/643 G 27 France Alain Prost 1-15
Italy Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 037 3.5 V12 27 Italy Gianni Morbidelli 16
28 France Jean Alesi All
Lola-Ford Cosworth 91 G 29 France Éric Bernard 1-15
France Larrousse F1 Ford Cosworth DFR 3.5 V8 29 Belgium Bertrand Gachot 16
30 Japan Aguri Suzuki All
Coloni-Ford Cosworth C4 G 31 Portugal Pedro Chaves 1-13
Italy Coloni Racing Ford Cosworth DFR 3.5 V8 31 Japan Naoki Hattori 15-16
Jordan-Ford Cosworth 191 G 32 Belgium Bertrand Gachot 1-10
Ireland Team 7Up Jordan Ford HB4 3.5 V8 32 Germany Michael Schumacher 11
32 Italy Alex Zanardi 12-16
33 Italy Andrea de Cesaris All
Lambo-Lamborghini 291 G 34 Italy Nicola Larini All
Italy Modena Team Lamborghini 3512 3.5 V12 35 Belgium Eric van de Poele All

Driver ChangesEdit

The biggest driver change in the winter of 1990 was the return of Nigel Mansell to Williams and "Red Five", partnering Riccardo Patrese. He left Ferrari, who drafted in Sicilian Jean Alesi to replace him, while the Championship winners McLaren retained Ayrton Senna and Gerhard Berger. Team Lotus, meanwhile, signed up rookie Mika Häkkinen and Julian Bailey as their main drivers, after a severe injury to Martin Donnelly at the 1990 Spanish Grand Prix ruled him out for the season.

Pre-season Chan​ges*Edit

The winter saw five drivers leave Formula One to be replaced by five débutantes. There were also two returning drivers, as well as eight inter-team changes in the four months between the Australian and US Grand Prix.

Inter-team / returning:

Débutantes:

Left Formula One:

* This list is based on the teams as they were entered for the 1990 Australian Grand Prix.

Mid-season ChangesEdit

There were also numerous mid-season changes in the new season, as various injuries, suspensions and sponsorship issues affected the ability for drivers to compete. The full list is shown below, broken up by each race change:

Brazil:

Canada:

Germany:

Belgium:

Italy:

Portugal:

Spain:

Japan:

Australia:

Team ChangesEdit

CalendarEdit

A sixteen race calendar for the 1991 was unveiled by FISA in the weeks prior to the start of the season, with the United States Grand Prix kicking off the new year in March.[1] The season would go on until November, with the city of Adelaide hosting the final race of the season, the Australian Grand Prix.[1] Trips to South America and Asia were also scheduled, along with the traditional European races dominating the mid season.[1] There were two new circuits for the teams to negotiate, with the Spanish Grand Prix set to be held at the new Circuit de Catalunya after a visit to Magny-Cours in France in June.[1]

ScheduleEdit

The complete schedule for the 1991 Formula One Season is outlined below:

Round Grand Prix Date
1 United States United States Grand Prix 10 March
PhoenixCircuit91
Official Title XXVIII Iceberg United States Grand Prix
Circuit Phoenix street circuit
Location United States Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Lap distance 3.721 km (2.313 mi)
Race distance 301.401 km (187.322 mi)
Date 10 March Laps 81
Local time 14.00 MST UTC 19:00
2 Brazil Brazilian Grand Prix 24 March
Interlagos1990
Official Title XX Grande Prêmio do Brasil
Circuit Autódromo José Carlos Pace
Location Brazil São Paulo, Brazil
Lap distance 4.325 km (2.688 mi)
Race distance 307.075 km (190.848 mi)
Date 24 March Laps 71
Local time 14:00 BRT UTC 17:00
3 San Marino San Marino Grand Prix 28 April
Imola 1981
Official Title XI Gran Premio di San Marino
Circuit Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari
Location San Marino Imola, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
Lap distance 5.040 km (3.132 mi)
Race distance 307.440 km (191.075 mi)
Date 28 April Laps 61
Local time 14:00 CET UTC 13:00
4 Monaco Monaco Grand Prix 12 May
Monaco 1986
Official Title XLIX Grand Prix Automobile de Monaco
Circuit Circuit de Monaco
Location Monaco Monte Carlo
Lap distance 3.328 km (2.068 mi)
Race distance 259.584 km (161.333 mi)
Date 12 May Laps 78
Local time 14:00 CET UTC 13:00
5 Canada Canadian Grand Prix 2 June
Circuit Gilles Villeneuve 1988
Official Title XXIX Grand Prix Molson du Canada
Circuit Circuit Gilles Villeneuve
Location Canada Montreal, Canada
Lap distance 4.430 km (2.753 mi)
Race distance 305.670 km (189.975 mi)
Date 2 June Laps 69
Local time 14:00 EDT UTC 18:00
6 Mexico Mexican Grand Prix 16 June
Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez 2002
Official Title XV Gran Premio de Mexico
Circuit Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez
Location Mexico Mexico City, Mexico
Lap distance 4.421 km (2.748 mi)
Race distance 305.049 km (189.589 mi)
Date 16 June Laps 67
Local time 14:00 CST UTC 20:00
7 France French Grand Prix 7 July
Magny Cours 1991
Official Title LXXVII Rhône-Poulenc Grand Prix de France
Circuit Circuit de Nevers
Location France Magny-Cours, France
Lap distance 4.250 km (2.641 mi)
Race distance 306.000 km (190.18 mi)
Date 7 July Laps 72
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
8 United Kingdom British Grand Prix 14 July
Silverstone1991
Official Title XLIV Foster's British Grand Prix
Circuit Silverstone
Location United Kingdom Silverstone, United Kingdom
Lap distance 5.226 km (3.248 mi)
Race distance 308.334 km (191.631 mi)
Date 14 July Laps 59
Local time 14:00 BST UTC 13:00
9 Germany German Grand Prix 28 July
Hockenheimring 1982
Official Title LIII Großer Mobil 1 Preis von Deutschland
Circuit Hockenheimring
Location Germany Hockenheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Lap distance 6.802 km (4.227 mi)
Race distance 306.090 km (190.236 mi)
Date 28 July Laps 45
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
10 Hungary Hungarian Grand Prix 11 August
Official Title VII Marlboro Magyar Nagydíj
Circuit Hungaroring
Location Hungary Budapest, Hungary
Lap distance 3.968 km (2.466 mi)
Race distance 305.536 km (189.892 mi)
Date 11 August Laps 77
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
11 Belgium Belgian Grand Prix 25 August
Spa 1983
Official Title XLIX Grand Prix de Belgique
Circuit Circuit de Spa Francorchamps
Location Belgium Spa Francorchamps, Belgium
Lap distance 6.940 km (4.313 mi)
Race distance 305.360 km (189.782 mi)
Date 25 August Laps 44
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
12 Italy Italian Grand Prix 12 September
Monza 1976
Official Title LXII Coca Cola Gran Premio d'Italia
Circuit Autodromo Nazionale Monza
Location Italy Monza, Italy
Lap distance 5.800 km (3.605 mi)
Race distance 307.400 km (191.05 mi)
Date 12 September Laps 53
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
13 Portugal Portuguese Grand Prix 22 September
Etoril 1984
Official Title XX Grande Prêmio de Portugal
Circuit Autódromo do Estoril
Location Portugal Estoril, Portugal
Lap distance 4.350 km (2.704 mi)
Race distance 308.850 km (191.952 mi)
Date 22 September Laps 71
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
14 Spain Spanish Grand Prix 29 September
Catalunya 1991
Official Title XXXIII Gran Premio Tío Pepe de España
Circuit Circuit de Catalunya
Location Spain Barcelona, Spain
Lap distance 4.747 km (2.95 mi)
Race distance 308.555 km (191.768 mi)
Date 29 September Laps 65
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
15 Japan Japanese Grand Prix 20 October
Official Title XVII Fuji Television Japanese Grand Prix
Circuit Suzuka Circuit
Location Japan Suzuka, Japan
Lap distance 5.864 km (3.644 mi)
Race distance 310.792 km (193.158 mi)
Date 20 October Laps 53
Local time 14:00 JST UTC 05:00
16 Australia Australian Grand Prix 2 November
Official Title Foster's Australian Grand Prix
Circuit Adelaide Street Circuit
Location Australia Adelaide, SA, Australia
Lap distance 3.780 km (2.349 mi)
Race distance 306.180 km (190.292 mi)
Date 2 November Laps 81
Local time 14:00 ACDT UTC 03:30

ChangesEdit

There were no new additions to the calendar between the 1990 and 1991 seasons, with all of the races held in the exact same order. The only difference between the two calendars were the venues, where two new circuits replaced two future test venues. Magny-Cours was chosen to host the French Grand Prix, with Paul Ricard falling out of favour, while Jerez was deemed too dangerous by the FIA after Martin Donnelly crashed heavily at the circuit, replaced by the brand new Circuit de Catalunya.

Season ReviewEdit

1991 proved to be one of the least controversial seasons in Formula One history, as Ayrton Senna won the Championship at a relative canter. The season also saw the election of a new president of FISA, as Max Mosley ousted Jean-Marie Balestre, a significant feat given that Mosley had been the legal advisor to FOCA during their dispute with FISA during the 1982 season.

Pre-seasonEdit

The biggest news stories from the winter of 1990 surrounded two new entrants to the Championship, as well as a few high profile moves. As Nigel Mansell returned to Williams, Jordan Grand Prix and Team Modena joined the Championship, replacing three fallen teams, EuroBrun Racing, Onyx and Life. Eddie Jordan's team showed early promise, with Gary Anderson designing what was widely regarded as the prettiest car of 1991, while Modena hired Lamborghini to design a chassis and engine for them.

McLaren, meanwhile, looked on course to dominate the season, with engine partner Honda handing them their newest and strongest engine for the season. Ferrari hired a promising youngster in Jean Alesi to try to counter the British team, while Benetton retained the two Brazilians they had in Roberto Moreno and veteran Nelson Piquet. Elsewhere, Osella evolved into Fondmetal, Arrows were re-branded as Footwork, while Leyton House completed their three year take over of March.

Pre-qualifying was to become a key feature of the weekend, as the FIA deemed that only 30 cars could use any circuit at any time. Therefore, the two newest teams in Jordan and Modena would join Dallara, Coloni and Fondmetal in a one off session before each race weekend to determine who would be able to enter the qualifying session.[2] The entry for pre-qualifying would be based on performance over the last half-season, with a review scheduled after the 1991 British Grand Prix.[2]

There were also changes to the points scoring system, as a win was now made to be worth ten points, rather than nine as it had traditionally been.[2] This created a four point gap to second to encourage more battles for the win, while there were also changes to the Championship scoring system.[2] Since 1985, the best eleven results of each driver were taken into account, but from 1991 onwards, all their results would come into account, as the FIA attempted to avoid the calculated manoeuvres that had dominated the conclusion of the previous two championships in Japan.[2]

Round 1: 1991 United States Grand PrixEdit

Senna USGP 91

Senna shoots into the lead at the 1991 United States Grand Prix in Phoenix, Arizona.

It was an electric start from Ayrton Senna, as the all conquering Brazilian took pole and victory in Phoenix to begin his title defence perfectly.[2] Having qualified a second quicker than his arch rival Alain Prost, Senna made a perfect start and remained untroubled in the two hour race, with the Frenchman taking second, and Nelson Piquet claiming third.[2] The two Tyrrell-Hondas claimed fourth and fifth, Stefano Modena ahead of Satoru Nakajima, while Aguri Suzuki claimed the final point in sixth, a lap down.[2]

The race had seen action early on provided by Riccardo Patrese, who had battled everyone from team mate Nigel Mansell in third to Gerhard Berger in sixth.[2] But the Williams FW14 had been fitted with an innovative new semi-automatic gearbox, which had not completed a session in race conditions, and would ultimately leave both Patrese and Mansell on the side lines.[2] Patrese's car was left abandoned in the middle of the track, before Roberto Moreno collected it a lap later, putting both cars over to one side of the track.[2]

Round 2: 1991 Brazilian Grand PrixEdit

It was almost a case of deja-vu in Brazil, as Ayrton Senna completed another dominant weekend to take both pole and the win, the first time he had triumphed at his home race.[3] An emotional Senna claimed his first Brazilian Grand Prix on his eighth attempt, despite a late shower and gearbox issues affecting his McLaren in the late stages of the race.[3] Nigel Mansell looked to be on the verge of beating him for a time, until he was stabbed in the back by his gearbox instead.[3]

Riccardo Patrese could also have snatched the victory away from Senna, although the timing of the rain was enough to halt Patrese's charge on the ailing McLaren in the closing stages, leaving the Italian a frustrated second.[3] Gerhard Berger claimed the final podium spot from the two Ferraris, with Alain Prost asserting his dominance over Jean Alesi early on, as Nelson Piquet forced his Benetton between them late on to take fifth.[3]

Round 3: 1991 San Marino Grand PrixEdit

Ayrton Senna almost suffered a shock in qualifying, as his 55th career pole was nearly snatched away by Riccardo Patrese in the dying seconds of the session.[4] But, it was the Brazilian's day, and on Sunday another dominant display earned him his third win of the season, after benefitting from a misfire in the Italian's car which ultimately ended his race.[4] The race had started in wet conditions, which had also benefitted Senna personally when arch rival Alain Prost slid of the track on the formation lap.[4]

As Senna claimed another victory, Gerhard Berger made it a McLaren-Honda one-two for the first time in 1991, while the field was stunned by JJ Lehto, who put the Dallara on the podium.[4] It had been a late race charge by the Finn, who benefitted from retirements as well as a brilliant move on Roberto Moreno to take his podium.[4] Pierluigi Martini claimed fourth for Minardi after a quiet race, while Mika Häkkinen secured two points in only his third race.[4] It was also a good day for Julian Bailey in the second Lotus-Judd, as he claimed the first point of his F1 career, despite he and team mate Hakkinen using the uncompetitive Lotus 91.[4]

Round 4: 1991 Monaco Grand PrixEdit

Senna MGP 1991

Ayrton Senna charges his way to victory in Monaco.

The title of Mr. Monaco had been earned by Ayrton Senna through his three previous victories in the principality, and his fourth victory on the streets of Monte Carlo was assured virtually from the start.[5] The Brazilian, starting as ever from pole, cleared the first corner to pull well ahead of second placed Stefano Modena, while Gerhard Berger and Nelson Piquet came to blows.[5] Modena ran in second until an infamous incident with Pierluigi Martini put him down the order, ultimately allowing Nigel Mansell and Jean Alesi to take the podium.[5]

Martini was being lapped by the Italian Modena at a time when the latter was underpressure from Riccardo Patrese, when the Minardi driver blocked the Tyrrell into the Nouvelle Chicane.[5] Martini was handed a ten second stop-go penalty, the first ever to be awarded in a Formula One race, while Modena suffered an engine fire that ended both his, and Patrese's race when the Williams driver was unsighted by the smoke and hit the barrier.[5] Mansell, meanwhile, made a classic move on Alain Prost for second, with the Frenchman going on to lose an almost certain podium place when he pitted to have a minor issue investigated.[5]

Round 5: 1991 Canadian Grand PrixEdit

The Canadian Grand Prix was a significant step in the 1991 Championship, as Ayrton Senna was defeated for the first time all season.[6] Having been beaten by Riccardo Patrese in qualifying, the Brazilian retired with an alternator failure in the race, as Nelson Piquet snatched a late victory for Benetton.[6] Nigel Mansell had looked set to win, until, on the final lap, the Brit allowed the revs of his engine drop too much while selecting a gear, causing him to stall just a few hundred metres from the finish.[6]

Having missed out on a potential podium in Monaco, Stefano Modena claimed a career best second place, while Patrese finished third having lost a large amount of time mid race.[6] A significant story also emerged at the Jordan Grand Prix team, as Andrea de Cesaris and Bertrand Gachot completed a double points finish for the new team.[6] The five points scored were the first for the team, and put them in prime position to escape pre-qualifying after the review post-Britain.[6]

Round 6: 1991 Mexican Grand PrixEdit

The Mexican Grand Prix of 1991 saw Riccardo Patrese do a Senna and take pole and victory after a faultless display in the now dominant Williams FW14.[7] Patrese had initially found himself down in fourth place, after Nigel Mansell beat him off the line, and Jean Alesi and Ayrton Senna dived down the inside of him into the first corner.[7] A fightback by Patrese saw him take Alesi and Senna in quick succession, before running side-by-side with Mansell through the first sector to take the lead and, ultimately, victory.[7]

AdC MexGP 91

Andrea de Cesaris pushes for fourth. Literally.

Senna, meanwhile, ultimately claimed third, ahead of Andrea de Cesaris, who was left to push his Jordan 191 across the line for fourth having run out of fuel through the Peraltada on the last lap.[7] He was initially disqualified from the race before the stewards recinded the punishment after judging the race to be over when he did so.[7] Roberto Moreno and Éric Bernard completed the points for their respective teams.[7]

Round 7: 1991 French Grand PrixEdit

The field was soon back in Europe, and it was Nigel Mansell who took up the sword against Championship leader Ayrton Senna with victory at a new venue for the Championship.[8] With the paddock gathered at Ligier's home circuit of Magny-Cours, Mansell battled his way from fourth to first in the opening stages to take victory in France, beating Alain Prost and Ayrton Senna, who were on the podium too.[8]

FraGP 91

Making moves with Nigel Mansell as he takes advantage of Andrea de Cesaris to pass Alain Prost.

It was a vintage move by Mansell to snatch the lead from Prost, as he used the slipstream produced by Prost and backmarker Andrea de Cesaris to close right on the back of the Ferrari, before darting to the inside of the braking zone of the hairpin.[8] Prost was left sandwiched between the Williams and the Jordan, and although de Cesaris yielded, the Frenchman was left to run around the outside of Adelaide and conceed the lead.[8] De Cesaris, for his part, would finish the race in sixth, behind Jean Alesi and Riccardo Patrese, who suffered from another poor start.[8]

Round 8: 1991 British Grand PrixEdit

Only one man was allowed to win the British Grand Prix when the field gathered at Silverstone, and it was not the Brazilian who had dominated the first quarter of the season.[9] Indeed, Nigel Mansell, with over 50,000 fans backing him, took one of the most memorable victories in Formula One history, captured in an infamous image.[9] He had had a race long battle with Ayrton Senna until, with less than a lap to go, the Brazilian ground to a halt having run out of fuel.[9] As Mansell completed his victory lap, he stopped to allow Senna to climb onto the top of the Williams, giving his rival for the 1991 title a lift back to pits in one of the most heart warming images produced in F1 lore.[9]

Mansell Senna GBGP 91

Nigel Mansell proves their was no bad blood between himself and Ayrton Senna in one of F1's most heart warming moments.

Mansell later revealed that the final two laps had been completed in only one gear, as Senna, and his McLaren team mate Gerhard Berger closed in.[9] Berger, meanwhile, was left to pick up Senna's second place, while Alain Prost completed the podium, with Senna finishing fourth.[9] Nelson Piquet completed a late charge to take fifth from Bertrand Gachot, with the latter ultimately finishing sixth to keep Jordan's scoring run going.[9] The result also ensured that Jordan escaped pre-qualifying for the rest of the season, joined by Dallara and Team Modena, despite the latter failing to score in any race so far.[9] Brabham, AGS and Footwork replaced them, the trio often failing to qualify for races, let alone score any points.[9]

Round 9: 1991 German Grand PrixEdit

The Hockenheimring was famous for its highspeed layout, punctured by chicanes and the stadium section near the end of the lap, and with was the former which had concerned Ayrton Senna before the race.[10] The Brazilian, who would start from second, argued that the tyre barriers that lined the outside of the chicanes be replaced by cones, as the barriers could allow cars to bounce back and roll onto the circuit.[10] FISA president Jean-Marie Balestre, who already had a chequred past with Senna, immediately rejected the idea, before the resolution was passed in Senna's favour after a vote by the drivers.[10]

Yet, although he had won that battle, Senna was left red faced in the race, as he ran out of fuel on the final lap of a race once again.[10] Nigel Mansell, meanwhile, had led the race virtually from the start to close the Championship gap ever closer, with team mate Riccardo Patrese second.[10] Alain Prost had been in the hunt for third in the closing stages, until a sneaky move by Senna ultimately caused the Ferrari to stall, as Prost was forced to stop down an escape road after being pushed onto a white line by the Brazilian.[10] Gerhard Berger claimed fourth in the other McLaren, having been unable to catch Jean Alesi in third, while the two Jordans claimed another double points finish to put them into the top five in the Constructors Championship. 

Round 10: 1991 Hungarian Grand PrixEdit

Ayrton Senna made a stunning return to form in Hungary, as he took pole and victory for the fifth time in 1991.[11] The Hungaroring had been criticised in the past for being a difficult place to overtake in 1990, and it was the same story in 1991.[11] Riccardo Patrese had been unable to beat Senna off the start, and was ultimately told by Williams to release Nigel Mansell so the Brit could attack Senna.[11] The top three remained in that order for the last two thirds of the race.

In a race that even saw a limited number of pitstops, and one of the lowest retirement figures of the season, the Hungarian Grand Prix of 1991 was not one to be remembered.[11] Gerhard Berger, meanwhile, secured fourth, with Jean Alesi and Ivan Capelli completing the points, with Alesi the only man to be putting on a show having overtaken a couple of people after a rare tyre change.[11]

Round 11: 1991 Belgian Grand PrixEdit

Schumacher 1991 Belgium

Michael Schumacher shoots sparks around Spa during his F1 début weekend.

The Belgian Grand Prix of 1991 would go down in history for one reason: the debut of a future legend Michael Schumacher for Jordan.[12] It had been a shock announcement that Mercedes-Benz would pay a team £200,000 (£50,000 of which was paid by Schumacher) that was sponsored by Ford to obtain a drive for the German youngster.[12] The rookie impressed on his debut, taking seventh in qualifying while using Bertrand Gachot's car (the Belgian having been gaoled in Britain for assault), although he would ultimately retire in the race.[12]

Championship-wise, Ayrton Senna completed another dominant display to take his sixth pole and victory of 1991, as title rival Nigel Mansell suffered a complete electrical failure at the halfway mark while leading.[12] This had handed the lead to Jean Alesi, as Senna had stopped for fresh tyres earlier, and duly swept past the Sicilian in the closing stages.[12] Gerhard Berger and Nelson Piquet completed the podium, with Roberto Moreno slotting into fourth, as McLaren and Benetton filled the top four.[12] Riccardo Patrese fought from the back of the field to finish fifth in the Williams, while Mark Blundell secured his first point of his eleven race old F1 career.[12]

Round 12: 1991 Italian Grand PrixEdit

Ayrton Senna was defeated for the first time from pole in 1991, as Nigel Mansell claimed victory from the Brazilian after a brilliant move through Ascari.[13] Mansell had initially allowed team mate Riccardo Patrese through to attack Senna, with the Italian making the exact move Mansell pulled to get past, before spinning in the exact same place after a gearbox issue.[13] The result closed the gap to 18 points between Championship leader Senna and Mansell in second, and ruled everyone else out of the title hunt.[13]

Behind the two title rivals was Alain Prost, who had spent the last couple of weeks complaining about Senna, before accepting FISA's decision on their incident in Germany, with Gerhard Berger taking fourth.[13] Michael Schumacher claimed his first Formula One points with fifth, after controversially shifting his colours to the Benetton team, a move which made both him and his new employers look bad publicly.[13] Schumacher's new team mate Nelson Piquet had been unable to match the rookie German throughout the weekend, but ended the race in sixth.[13]

Round 13: 1991 Portuguese Grand PrixEdit

The Portuguese Grand Prix of 1991 was a battle fought in qualifying, as Riccardo Patrese took pole and victory, as the title battle shifted dramatically in Ayrton Senna's favour.[14] Senna's advantage came after finishing second, in a race that saw his title rival Nigel Mansell disqualified and the Brazilian extend his lead to 24 points.[14] Mansell, for his part, was the victim of a poor pitstop by Williams, which saw the right rear wheel of his car flick off his car a few metres away from the box, leaving Mansell stranded in the middle of the pitlane.[14] His team managed to man-handle a replacement onto the axle, but FISA disqualified the car regardless for servicing the car outside of the pitbox.[14]

Away from the title battle, Jean Alesi completed a good weekend to stand third on the podium, ahead of the Minardi-Ferrari of Pierluigi Martini.[14] Ivan Capelli was running fifth until the closing stages, until the Italian lost the rear of his car and slammed into the wall, promoting Nelson Piquet and Michael Schumacher into fifth and sixth.[14]

Round 14: 1991 Spanish Grand PrixEdit

The Formula One paddock's first visit to Catalunya saw Nigel Mansell just keep his title hopes alive with victory, as Ayrton Senna only managed fifth.[15] The race had started in the wet, and Senna had initially seemed on his way to the title, having taken second from Mansell off the line.[15] Michael Schumacher had also slung past the Brit off the line, but was soon passed by Mansell as the track dried, while a rare mistake by Senna caused him to spin at the final corner, dropping him down to seventh.[15]

Gerhard Berger had led until that point, before retiring at the halfway mark with an engine failure, which promoted Mansell to victory, Alain Prost into second, and Riccardo Patrese to third.[15] A quiet race had emerged after the Senna incident, as retirements spread the field thinly around the newest F1 venue, leaving Jean Alesi to claim fourth, and Schumacher, who also avoided the spinning Senna, sixth.[15]

Round 15: 1991 Japanese Grand PrixEdit

Nigel Mansell was finally out of the title fight in Japan, as Ayrton Senna claimed his third World Championship in Suzuka, finishing second in the race to team mate Gerhard Berger.[16] Mansell had been a serious threat to Senna in the early stages, as the Brazilian allowed team mate Berger to sprint away to deny Mansell a potential victory should he have got past Senna.[16] As it happened, Mansell cracked under his own pressure and threw himself out of the race while trying to pass, leaving Senna and Berger to try their hand at formation flying for the McLaren-Honda team until the end of the race.[16]

Williams-Renault were still in the Constructors' Championship hunt, however, as Riccardo Patrese earned third place to keep Williams within 11 points of McLaren.[16] McLaren would, regardless, arrive in Adelaide as favourites, as Ferrari confirmed their third place through Alain Prost's fourth.[16] Martin Brundle secured his first points of the season in fifth, while Nelson Piquet claimed sixth.

Round 16: 1991 Australian Grand PrixEdit

1991 Australian Grand Prix start

Ayrton Senna leads the field away at the start of a soaking Australian Grand Prix.

The 1991 edition of the Australian Grand Prix would go down in history as the shortest ever Grand Prix to be held as a World Championship race.[17] The race lasted until the lap sixteen, although the chaos of the final two laps, caused by torrential rain, meant that the result was declared from the order of the cars on lap fourteen.[17] Ayrton Senna therefore claimed victory to win McLaren the Constructors Championship, with Nigel Mansell and Gerhard Berger completing the podium.[17]

Before the race weekend, Alain Prost had made the headlines after being sacked by Ferrari, having moaned almost continuosly throughout the year.[17] Gianni Morbidelli was duly called up to replace him from Minardi, with the Italian securing the first points of his career by finishing sixth.[17] It was only to half a point however, as Formula One rules meant that any race that failed to reach 75% of the scheduled distance could not have the full point score allocated.[17] The remaining points went to Nelson Piquet and Riccardo Patrese, amid protests over the countback, with the original finishing order having been Senna, Piquet, Morbidelli, Andrea de Cesaris, Alex Zanardi and Stefano Modena.[17]

Post-seasonEdit

ResultsEdit

Final StandingsEdit

The final standings are shown below with breakdowns of all of the statistics from the season

Drivers' ChampionshipEdit

Ayrton Senna therefore claimed his third World Title, having led the Championship from the first lap of the first race in the US. Nigel Mansell and Riccardo Patrese managed to claim second and third, while Gerhard Berger completed an all Williams and McLaren top four. Alain Prost's first winless season since his début year resulted in fifth, while Nelson Piquet retired having finished his final season in sixth.

Pos. Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Pts
Flag of the United States Flag of Brazil Flag of San Marino Flag of Monaco Flag of Canada Flag of Mexico Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of Germany Flag of Hungary Flag of Belgium Flag of Italy Flag of Portugal Flag of Spain Flag of Japan Flag of Australia
1st Senna 1st 1st 1st 1st Ret 3rd 3rd 4th 7th 1st 1st 2nd 2nd 5th 2nd 1st 96
2nd Mansell Ret Ret Ret 2nd 6th 2nd 1st 1st 1st 2nd Ret 1st DSQ 1st Ret 2nd 72
3rd Patrese Ret 2nd Ret Ret 3rd 1st 5th Ret 2nd 3rd 5th Ret 1st 3rd 3rd 5th 53
4th Berger Ret 3rd 2nd Ret Ret Ret Ret 2nd 4th 4th 2nd 4th Ret Ret 1st 3rd 43
5th Prost 2nd 4th DNS 5th Ret Ret 2nd 3rd Ret Ret Ret 3rd Ret 2nd 4th 34
6th Piquet 3rd 5th Ret Ret 1st Ret 8th 5th Ret Ret 3rd 6th 5th 11th 7th 4th 26.5
7th Alesi 12th 6th Ret 3rd Ret Ret 4th Ret 3rd 5th Ret Ret 3rd 4th Ret Ret 21
8th Modena 4th Ret Ret Ret 2nd 11th Ret 7th 13th 12th Ret Ret Ret 16th 6th 10th 10
9th de Cesaris DNPQ Ret Ret Ret 4th 4th 6th Ret 5th 7th 13th 7th 8th Ret Ret 8th 9
10th Moreno Ret 7th 13th 4th Ret 5th Ret Ret 8th 8th 4th Ret 10th 10th 8
11th Martini 9th Ret 4th 12th 7th Ret 9th 9th Ret Ret 12th Ret 4th 13th Ret Ret 6
12th Lehto Ret Ret 3rd 11th Ret Ret Ret 13th Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 8th Ret 12th 4
13th Gachot 10th 13th Ret 8th 5th Ret Ret 6th 6th 9th DNQ 4
14th Schumacher Ret 5th 6th 6th Ret Ret 4
15th Nakajima 5th Ret Ret Ret 10th 12th Ret 8th Ret 15th Ret Ret 13th 17th Ret Ret 2
16th Häkkinen Ret 9th 5th Ret Ret 9th DNQ 12th Ret 14th Ret 14th 14th Ret Ret 19th 2
17th Brundle 11th 12th 11th EX Ret Ret Ret Ret 11th Ret 9th 13th 12th 10th 5th DNQ 2
18th Pirro Ret 11th DNPQ 6th 9th DNPQ DNPQ 10th 10th Ret 8th 10th Ret 15th Ret 7th 1
19th Blundell Ret Ret 8th Ret DNQ Ret Ret Ret 12th Ret 6th 12th Ret Ret DNPQ 17th 1
20th Capelli Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 6th Ret 8th 17th Ret 1
21st Bernard Ret Ret Ret 9th Ret 6th Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret DNQ Ret DNQ INJ 1
22nd Suzuki 6th Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret DNQ DNQ RetDNQ Ret DNQ 1
23rd Bailey DNQ DNQ 6th DNQ 1
24th Morbidelli Ret 8th Ret Ret Ret 7th Ret 11th Ret 13th Ret 9th 9th 14th Ret 6th 0.5
Gugelmin Ret Ret 12th Ret Ret Ret 7th Ret Ret 11th Ret 15th 7th 7th 8th 14th 0
Boutsen Ret 10th 7th 7th Ret 8th 12th Ret 9th 17th 11th Ret 16th Ret 9th Ret 0
Herbert DNQ 10th 10th 14th 7th Ret Ret 11th 0
Larini 7th DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ Ret 16th DNQ 16th DNQ DNQ DNQ Ret 0
Comas DNQ Ret 10th 10th 8th DNQ 11th DNQ Ret 10th Ret 11th 11th Ret Ret 18th 0
Tarquini 8th Ret DNQ Ret DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNQ 12th 11th DNPQ 0
Zanardi 9th Ret 9th 0
van de Poele DNPQ DNPQ 9th DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ 0
Caffi DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNPQ DNPQ DNQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ 10th 15th 0
Grouillard DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ Ret Ret DNPQ DNPQ DNQ 10th Ret DNPQ DNPQ 0
Alboreto Ret DNQ DNQ Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret DNQ DNQ DNPQ DNQ 15th Ret DNQ 13th 0
Wendlinger Ret 20th 0
Johansson DNQ DNQ Ret DNQ DNQ DNQ 0
Barbazza DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ 0
Bartels DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ 0
Chaves DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ 0
Hattori DNPQ DNPQ 0
Pos. Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Pts
Flag of the United States Flag of Brazil Flag of San Marino Flag of Monaco Flag of Canada Flag of Mexico Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of Germany Flag of Hungary Flag of Belgium Flag of Italy Flag of Portugal Flag of Spain Flag of Japan Flag of Australia

Constructors' ChampionshipEdit

Pos. Constructor Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Pts
Flag of the United States Flag of Brazil Flag of San Marino Flag of Monaco Flag of Canada Flag of Mexico Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of Germany Flag of Hungary Flag of Belgium Flag of Italy Flag of Portugal Flag of Spain Flag of Japan Flag of Australia
1st McLaren Senna 1st 1st 1st 1st Ret 3rd 3rd 4th 7th 1st 1st 2nd 2nd 5th 2nd 1st 139
Berger Ret 3rd 2nd Ret Ret Ret Ret 2nd 4th 4th 2nd 4th Ret Ret 1st 3rd
2nd Williams Mansell Ret Ret Ret 2nd 6th 2nd 1st 1st 1st 2nd Ret 1st DSQ 1st Ret 2nd 129
Patrese Ret 2nd Ret Ret 3rd 1st 5th Ret 2nd 3rd 5th Ret 1st 3rd 3rd 5th
3rd Ferrari Prost 2nd 4th DNS 5th Ret Ret 2nd 3rd Ret Ret Ret 3rd Ret 2nd 4th 55.5
Morbidelli 6th
Alesi 12th 6th Ret 3rd Ret Ret 4th Ret 3rd 5th Ret Ret 3rd 4th Ret Ret
4th Benetton Moreno Ret 7th 13th 4th Ret 5th Ret Ret 8th 8th 4th 38.5
Schumacher 5th 6th 6th Ret Ret
Piquet 3rd 5th Ret Ret 1st Ret 8th 5th Ret Ret 3rd 6th 5th 11th 7th 4th
5th Jordan Gachot 10th 13th Ret 8th 5th Ret Ret 6th 6th 9th 13
Schumacher Ret
Moreno Ret 10th
Zanardi 9th Ret 9th
de Cesaris DNPQ Ret Ret Ret 4th 4th 6th Ret 5th 7th 13th 7th 8th Ret Ret 8th
6th Tyrrell Nakajima 5th Ret Ret Ret 10th 12th Ret 8th Ret 15th Ret Ret 13th 17th Ret Ret 12
Modena 4th Ret Ret Ret 2nd 11th Ret 7th 13th 12th Ret Ret Ret 16th 6th 10th
7th Minardi Martini 9th Ret 4th 12th 7th Ret 9th 9th Ret Ret 12th Ret 4th 13th Ret Ret 6
Morbidelli Ret 8th Ret Ret Ret 7th Ret 11th Ret 13th Ret 9th 9th 14th Ret
Moreno 10th
8th Dallara Pirro Ret 11th DNPQ 6th 9th DNPQ DNPQ 10th 10th Ret 8th 10th Ret 15th Ret 7th 5
Lehto Ret Ret 3rd 11th Ret Ret Ret 13th Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 8th Ret 12th
9th Lotus Häkkinen Ret 9th 5th Ret Ret 9th DNQ 12th Ret 14th Ret 14th 14th Ret Ret 19th 3
Bailey DNQ DNQ 6th DNQ
Herbert DNQ 10th 10th 14th 7th Ret Ret 11th
Bartels DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ
10th Brabham Brundle 11th 12th 11th EX Ret Ret Ret Ret 11th Ret 9th 13th 12th 10th 5th DNQ 3
Blundell Ret Ret 8th Ret DNQ Ret Ret Ret 12th Ret 6th 12th Ret Ret DNPQ 17th
11th Lola Bernard Ret Ret Ret 9th Ret 6th Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret DNQ Ret DNQ INJ 2
Gachot DNQ
Suzuki 6th Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret DNQ DNQ RetDNQ Ret DNQ
12th Leyton House Gugelmin Ret Ret 12th Ret Ret Ret 7th Ret Ret 11th Ret 15th 7th 7th 8th 14th 1
Capelli Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 6th Ret 8th 17th Ret
Wendlinger Ret 20th
Ligier Boutsen Ret 10th 7th 7th Ret 8th 12th Ret 9th 17th 11th Ret 16th Ret 9th Ret 0
Comas DNQ Ret 10th 10th 8th DNQ 11th DNQ Ret 10th Ret 11th 11th Ret Ret 18th
Lambo Larini 7th DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ Ret 16th DNQ 16th DNQ DNQ DNQ Ret 0
van de Poele DNPQ DNPQ 9th DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ
AGS Tarquini 8th Ret DNQ Ret DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNQ 0
Grouillard DNPQ
Johansson DNQ DNQ
Barbazza DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ
Fondmetal Grouillard DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ Ret Ret DNPQ DNPQ DNQ 10th Ret DNPQ 0
Tarquini 12th 11th DNPQ
Footwork* Alboreto Ret Ret DNQ DNQ DNPQ DNQ 15th Ret DNQ 13th 0
Caffi DNPQ DNPQ DNQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ 10th 15th
Johansson DNQ DNQ
Footwork Alboreto Ret DNQ DNQ Ret Ret Ret 0
Caffi DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ
Johansson DNQ DNQ Ret DNQ
Coloni Chaves DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ DNPQ 0
Hattori DNPQ DNPQ
Pos. Constructor Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Pts
Flag of the United States Flag of Brazil Flag of San Marino Flag of Monaco Flag of Canada Flag of Mexico Flag of France Flag of the United Kingdom Flag of Germany Flag of Hungary Flag of Belgium Flag of Italy Flag of Portugal Flag of Spain Flag of Japan Flag of Australia

ReferencesEdit

  1. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named Wiki
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: UNITED STATES GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999),http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr501.html, (Accessed 31/07/2015)
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: BRAZILIAN GP, 1991',grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr502.html, (Accessed 01/08/2015
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: SAN MARINO GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999),http://www.manipef1.com/results/1991/sanmarino/race/, (Accessed 09/08/2015)
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: MONACO GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999),http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr504.html, (Accessed 03/08/2015)
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: CANADIAN GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999),http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr505.html, (Accessed 03/08/2015)
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: MEXICAN GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr506.html, (Accessed 04/08/2015)
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: FRENCH GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr507.html, (Accessed 07/08/2015)
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 9.8 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: BRITISH GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr508.html, (Accessed 07/08/2015)
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: GERMAN GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr509.html, (Accessed 09/08/2015)
  11. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named HunGP
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5 12.6 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: BELGIAN GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr511.html, (Accessed 12/08/2015)
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 13.5 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: ITALIAN GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr512.html, (Accessed 14/08/2015)
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: PORTUGUESE GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr513.html, (Accessed 16/08/2015)
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: SPANISH GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr514.html, (Accessed 16/08/2015)
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: JAPANESE GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr515.html, (Accessed 17/08/2015)
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 17.5 17.6 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: AUSTRALIAN GP, 1991', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 1999), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr516.html, (Accessed 17/08/2015)
v·d·e Nominate this page for Featured Article
V T E 1991 Formula One Season
Teams McLaren • Tyrrell • Williams • Brabham • Footwork • Lotus • Fondmetal • Leyton House • AGS • Benetton • Dallara • Minardi • Ligier • Ferrari • Lola • Coloni • Jordan • Lambo
Engines Ferrari • Ford • Honda • Ilmor • Judd • Lamborghini • Porsche • Renault • Yamaha
Drivers Senna • 2 Berger • 3 Nakajima • 4 Modena • 5 Mansell • 6 Patrese • 7 Brundle • 8 Blundell • 9 Alboreto • 10 Caffi • 10 Johansson • 11 Häkkinen • 12 Bailey • 12 Herbert • 12 Bartels • 14 Grouillard • 14 Tarquini • 15 Gugelmin • 16 Capelli • 16 Wendlinger • 17 Tarquini • 17 Grouillard • 18 Johansson • 18 Barbazza • 19 Moreno • 19 Schumacher • 20 Piquet • 21 Pirro • 22 Lehto • 23 Martini • 24 Morbidelli • 24 Moreno • 25 Boutsen • 26 Comas • 27 Prost • 27 Morbidelli • 28 Alesi • 29 Bernard • 29 Gachot • 30 Suzuki • 31 Chaves • 31 Hattori • 32 Gachot • 32 Schumacher • 32 Moreno • 32 Zanardi • 33 De Cesaris • 34 Larini • 35 Van de Poele
Other Drivers McNish
Cars McLaren MP4/6 • Williams FW14 • Ferrari 642 • Ferrari 643 • Benetton B190B • Benetton B191 • Jordan 191 • Tyrrell 020 • Minardi M191 • Dallara 191 • Lotus 102B • Brabham BT60Y • Lola LC91 • Leyton House CG911 • Ligier JS35 • Lambo 291 • AGS JH25 • AGS JH25B • AGS JH27 • Fondmetal FA1M-E • Fondmetal Fomet-1 • Footwork FA12 • Footwork A11C • Coloni C4
Tyres Goodyear • Pirelli
Races United States • Brazil • San Marino • Monaco • Canada • Mexico • France • Britain • Germany • Hungary • Belgium • Italy • Portugal • Spain • Japan • Australia
See also 1990 Formula One Season • 1992 Formula One Season • Category
V T E Formula One Seasons
1950 • 1951 • 1952 • 1953 • 1954 • 1955 • 1956 • 1957 • 1958 • 1959 • 1960 • 1961 • 1962 • 1963 • 1964 • 1965 • 1966 • 1967 • 1968 • 1969 • 1970 • 1971 • 1972 • 1973 • 1974 • 1975 • 1976 • 1977 • 1978 • 1979 • 1980 • 1981 • 1982 • 1983 • 1984 • 1985 • 1986 • 1987 • 1988 • 1989 • 1990 • 1991 • 1992 • 1993 • 1994 • 1995 • 1996 • 1997 • 1998 • 1999 • 2000 • 2001 • 2002 • 2003 • 2004 • 2005 • 2006 • 2007 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 • 2013 • 2014 • 2015 • 2016 • 2017 • 2018

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