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The 1974 FIA Formula One World Championship, otherwise known as the 1974 Formula One Season, was the twenty-fifth edition of the Formula One World Championship and the then longest season in F1 history. The season began on the 13th January with the Argentine Grand Prix before heading to Europe after a brief stops in Brazil and South Africa. The season then came to its conclusion with trips to Canada and the United States, the latter held on the 6th October to bring the fifteen race season to its conclusion.

Jackie Stewart retired at the end of the 1973, meaning the Scot would not defend his third World Championship crown when the season started in Argentina.[1] As it turned out it would be a former Champion who shot to victory at the opening round, with 1967 Champion Denny Hulme sweeping home to claim the final win of his career.[1]

A popular home win for Emerson Fittipaldi followed in Brazil, before Carlos Reutemann claimed a memorable win in South Africa for Brabham.[2] Niki Lauda then picked up his maiden victory with a dominant display at the Spanish Grand Prix, claiming pole and fastest lap on the way for Ferrari, before Fittipaldi swept to a second win of the season in Belgium.[3]

Ronnie Peterson and Jody Scheckter became the fifth and sixth different winners in Monaco and Sweden respectively, while Lauda picked up a second win at the Dutch Grand Prix.[4] Peterson and Scheckter then picked up their second wins in France and Britain, before Clay Regazzoni became the seventh different winner with victory at the Nordschleife.[5] Victory in Austria would then go to Reutemann, Peterson swept to a third triumph in Italy, before Fittipaldi claimed his third victory of the season in Canada.[6]

That last series of races meant that season finale at Watkins Glen would see a three way fight for the title, with Fittipaldi and Regazzoni tied on 52 points, while Scheckter arrived with 45 points to his name.[7] Ultimately, it was a retirement for Scheckter and a miserable afternoon for Regazzoni that decided the fate of the Championship, with Fittipaldi crowned as World Champion for the second time in three seasons.[7] His team McLaren, meanwhile, picked up their first International Cup for Manufacturers' crown having beaten Ferrari by eight points.[7]

Away from the title fight it would be a typical F1 season full of intrigue, delight and disappointment. New teams, new drivers and new race winners helped to expand F1's appeal, although a dispute between the FIA, F.O.C.A. and the CSI would keep political interest at the fore. Yet, huge accidents and fatalities would puncture the season, as Peter Revson and Helmuth Koinigg paid the ultimate price in the search for speed.

BackgroundEdit

Teams and DriversEdit

Entry ListEdit

Constructor Chassis Tyre No. Driver Rounds
Team Engine
Lotus-Ford 72E
76
G 1 Sweden Ronnie Peterson All
United Kingdom John Player Team Lotus Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 2 Belgium Jacky Ickx All
31 Australia Tim Schenken 15
Tyrrell-Ford 005
006
007
G 3 South Africa Jody Scheckter All
United Kingdom Elf Team Tyrrell Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 4 France Patrick Depailler All
McLaren-Ford M23 G 5 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi All
United Kingdom Marlboro Team Texaco
United Kingdom Yardley Team McLaren
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 6 New Zealand Denny Hulme All
33 United Kingdom Mike Hailwood 1-11
33 United Kingdom David Hobbs 12-13
33 Germany Jochen Mass 14-15
Brabham-Ford BT42
BT44
G 7 Argentina Carlos Reutemann All
United Kingdom Motor Racing Development Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 8 United Kingdom Richard Robarts 1-3
8 Liechtenstein Rikky von Opel 4-9
8 Brazil Carlos Pace 10-15
34 Belgium Teddy Pilette 5
March-Ford 741 G 9 Germany Hans-Joachim Stuck 1-6, 8-15
United Kingdom March Engineering Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 9 Sweden Reine Wisell 7
10 New Zealand Howden Ganley 1-2
10 Italy Vittorio Brambilla 3-15
Ferrari 312B3-74 G 11 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni All
Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 001/11 3.0 F12 12 Austria Niki Lauda All
BRM P160E
P201
F 14 France Jean-Pierre Beltoise All
United Kingdom Team Motul BRM BRM P142 3.0 V12 15 France Henri Pescarolo 1-11, 13
15 New Zealand Chris Amon 14-15
37 France François Migault 1-6, 8-11, 13
Shadow-Ford DN1
DN3
G 16 United States Peter Revson 1-2
United States UOP Shadow Racing Team Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 16 United Kingdom Brian Redman 4-6
16 Sweden Bertil Roos 7
16 United Kingdom Tom Pryce 8-15
17 France Jean-Pierre Jarier 1-2, 4-15
Surtees-Ford TS16 F 18 Brazil Carlos Pace 1-7
United Kingdom Team Surtees
United Kingdom Bang & Olufsen Team Surtees
United Kingdom Memphis International Team Surtees
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 18 France José Dolhem 9, 15
18 United Kingdom Derek Bell 10-14
19 Germany Jochen Mass 1-11
19 France Jean-Pierre Jabouille 12
19 France José Dolhem 13
19 Austria Helmuth Koinigg 14-15
30 Austria Dieter Quester 12
Iso-Marlboro-Ford FW F 20 Italy Arturo Merzario 1-6, 8-15
United Kingdom Frank Williams Racing Cars Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 20 United Kingdom Richard Robarts 7
21 Denmark Tom Belsø 3-4, 7, 10
21 Netherlands Gijs van Lennep 1-11
21 France Jean-Pierre Jabouille 9
21 France Jacques Laffite 11-15
Ensign-Ford N174 F 22 Liechtenstein Rikky von Opel 1
United Kingdom Team Ensign Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 22 Australia Vern Schuppan 5-11
22 United Kingdom Mike Wilds 12-15
McLaren-Ford M23 G 23 South Africa Dave Charlton 3
South Africa Scribnate Lucky Strike Racing Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8
Trojan-Ford T103 F 23
29
41
Australia Tim Schenken 4-6, 8, 10-13
United Kingdom Trojan-Tauranac Racing Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8
Surtees-Ford TS16 F 23
43
44
Finland Leo Kinnunen 5, 7, 9-10, 12-13
Finland AAW Racing Team Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8
March-Ford
Hesketh-Ford
731
308
F G 24 United Kingdom James Hunt All
United Kingdom Hesketh Racing Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 31 South Africa Ian Scheckter 12
Lola-Ford T370 F 26 United Kingdom Graham Hill All
United Kingdom Embassy Hill with Graham Hill Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 27 United Kingdom Guy Edwards 1-2, 4-9, 11
27 United Kingdom Peter Gethin 10
27 Germany Rolf Stommelen 12-15
Brabham-Ford BT42
BT44
F 28 United Kingdom John Watson All
United Kingdom John Goldie Racing with Hexagon Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 34 Brazil Carlos Pace 9
Lotus-Ford 72E G 29 South Africa Ian Scheckter 3
South Africa Team Gunston Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 30 South Africa Paddy Driver 3
Amon-Ford AF101 F 30 New Zealand Chris Amon 4, 6, 11, 13
United Kingdom Chris Amon Racing Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 30 Australia Larry Perkins 11
Lyncar-Ford 006 F 30 New Zealand John Nicholson 10
United Kingdom Pinch Plant Limited Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8
March-Ford 731 F 35 United Kingdom Mike Wilds 10
United Kingdom Dempster International Racing Team Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8
Lola-Ford T370 F 31 Italy Carlo Facetti 13
Italy Scuderia Finotto Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 32 Austria Helmuth Koinigg 12
43 France Gérard Larrousse 5, 9
Tyrrell-Ford 004 F 32 South Africa Eddie Keizan 3
South Africa Blignaut Embassy Racing Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8
Token-Ford RJ02 F 32
35
United Kingdom Ian Ashley 11-12
United Kingdom Token Racing Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 42 United Kingdom Tom Pryce 5
42 United Kingdom David Purley 10
Brabham-Ford BT42 G 42 United Kingdom Ian Ashley 14-15
United Kingdom The Chequered Flag Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8
Brabham-Ford BT42 G 50 Canada Eppie Wietzes 14
Canada Team Canada F1 Racing Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8
Parnelli-Ford VPJ4 F 55 United States Mario Andretti 14-15
United States Vel's Parnelli Jones Racing Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8
Penske-Ford PC1 G 66 United States Mark Donohue 14-15
United States Penske Cars Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8
Brabham-Ford BT42 G 208 Italy Lella Lombardi 10
United Kingdom Allied Polymer Group Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8

CalendarEdit

A joint-record fifteen race calendar was put together by the FIA for 1974 Formula One World Championship, with visits to four continents across ten months of action. Three additional, non-Championship races were also added to the Calendar, which added two different circuits to the 1974 circus.

World Championship ScheduleEdit

Only minor revisions were made to the calendar over the winter of 1973/4, with all fifteen Grand Prix from 1973 retained. The only change to the order would be the Dutch Grand Prix, which moved back into a more familiar June date, with the French and British Grand Prix making way. There was also little change to the length of the active season either, with the World Championship starting in late-January, before concluding in early October.

Circuit-wise there would be one new circuit for the F1 field to discover, for the French Grand Prix was to be staged at the relatively tiny Dijon-Prenois circuit. The Argentine Grand Prix used the same circuit, albeit with a revised layout, while all other venues with recent updates remained unchanged. Elsewhere, Brands Hatch replaced Silverstone as host of the British Grand Prix as part of their well established deal, Circuito del Jarama replaced Montjuïc as the home of the Spanish Grand Prix, while Nivelles-Baulers played host to the Belgian Grand Prix in place of Zolder.

The full World Championship Schedule for 1974 is outlined below:

Round Grand Prix Date
1 Argentina Argentine Grand Prix 13 January
Autódromo Oscar y Juan Gálvez Circuito N° 15
Official Title XI Gran Premio de la Republica Argentina
Circuit Autódromo Municipal Ciudad de Buenos Aires
Location Argentina Buenos Aires, Argentina
Lap distance 5.968 km (3.709 mi)
Race distance 316.315 km (196.591 mi)
Date 13 January Laps 53
Local time 14:00 ART UTC 17:00
2 Brazil Brazilian Grand Prix 27 January
Interlagos 1973
Official Title III Grande Prêmio do Brasil
Circuit Autódromo do Interlagos
Location Brazil São Paulo, Brazil
Lap distance 7.960 km (4.947 mi)
Race distance 318.400 km (197.887 mi)
Date 27 January Laps 40
Local time 14:00 BRT UTC 17:00
3 South Africa South African Grand Prix 30 March
Kyalami 1968layout
Official Title VIII South African Grand Prix
Circuit Kyalami
Location South Africa Midrand, Gauteng, South Africa
Lap distance 4.104 km (2.551 mi)
Race distance 320.112 km (198.951 mi)
Date 30 March Laps 78
Local time 14:00 SAST UTC 12:00
4 Spain Spanish Grand Prix 28 April
Circuito Permanente del Jarama 1980
Official Title XX Gran Premio de España
Circuit Circuito del Jarama
Location Spain Jarama, Madrid, Spain
Lap distance 3.404 km (2.116 mi)
Race distance 285.936 km (177.71 mi)
Date 28 April Laps 84
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
5 Belgium Belgian Grand Prix 12 May
Nivelles-Baulers
Official Title XXXII Bang & Olufsen Grote Prijs van Belgie
Circuit Nivelles-Baulers
Location Belgium Baulers, Walloon Brabant, Wallonia, Belgie
Lap distance 3.723 km (2.314 mi)
Race distance 316.455 km (196.678 mi)
Date 12 May Laps 85
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
6 Monaco Monaco Grand Prix 23 May
Circuit de Monaco 1973
Official Title XXXII Grand Prix Automobile de Monaco
Circuit Circuit de Monaco
Location Monaco Monte-Carlo, Monaco
Lap distance 3.278 km (2.037 mi)
Race distance 255.684 km (158.909 mi)
Date 23 May Laps 78
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
7 Sweden Swedish Grand Prix 9 June
Official Title X Texaco Grand Prix of Sweden
Circuit Scandinavian Raceway
Location Sweden Anderstorp, Sweden
Lap distance 4.018 km (2.497 mi)
Race distance 321.440 km (199.776 mi)
Date 9 June Laps 80
Local time 14:00 CET UTC 12:00
8 Netherlands Dutch Grand Prix 23 June
CircuitZandvoort1980
Official Title XXI Grote Prijs van Nederland
Circuit Circuit Park Zandvoort
Location Netherlands Zandvoort, Netherlands
Lap distance 4.252 km (2.643 mi)
Race distance 318.900 km (198.198 mi)
Date 23 June Laps 75
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
9 France French Grand Prix 7 July
Circuit de Dijon-Prenois-1972
Official Title LX Grand Prix de France
Circuit Dijon-Prenois
Location France Dijon, France
Lap distance 3.289 km (2.044 mi)
Race distance 263.120 km (163.53 mi)
Date 7 July Laps 80
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
10 United Kingdom British Grand Prix 20 July
Brands Hatch Grand Prix circuit 1960-1975
Official Title XXVII John Player British Grand Prix
Circuit Brands Hatch
Location United Kingdom Fawkham, Kent, United Kingdom
Lap distance 4.206 km (2.614 mi)
Race distance 315.450 km (196.053 mi)
Date 20 July Laps 75
Local time 14:00 BST UTC 13:00
11 West Germany German Grand Prix 4 August
Nürburgring 1967
Official Title XXXVI Großer Preis von Deutschland
Circuit Nürburgring
Location West Germany Nürburg, West Germany
Lap distance 22.835 km (14.192 mi)
Race distance 319.690 km (198.689 mi)
Date 4 August Laps 14
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
12 Austria Austrian Grand Prix 18 August
Österreichring 1969-1976
Official Title XII Großer Preis von Österreich
Circuit Österreichring
Location Austria Spielburg, Styria, Austria
Lap distance 5.911 km (3.674 mi)
Race distance 319.194 km (198.38 mi)
Date 18 August Laps 54
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
13 Italy Italian Grand Prix 8 September
Monza 1972
Official Title XLV Gran Premio d'Italia
Circuit Autodromo Nazionale Monza
Location Italy Monza, Lombardy, Italy
Lap distance 5.780 km (3.592 mi)
Race distance 300.560 km (186.799 mi)
Date 8 September Laps 52
Local time 14:00 CEST UTC 12:00
14 Canada Canadian Grand Prix 22 September
Mosport
Official Title XIV Grand Prix Labatt du Canada
Circuit Mosport Park
Location Canada Bowmanville, Ontario, Canada
Lap distance 3.957 km (2.459 mi)
Race distance 316.560 km (196.743 mi)
Date 22 September Laps 80
Local time 14:00 CST UTC 20:00
15 United States United States Grand Prix 6 October
Watkins Glen International Track Map-1970-1980
Official Title XVII Grand Prix of the United States
Circuit Watkins Glen
Location United States Watkins Glen, New York, USA
Lap distance 5.435 km (3.378 mi)
Race distance 320.670 km (199.298 mi)
Date 6 October Laps 59
Local time 14:00 ET UTC 19:00

Non-Championship RacesEdit

As was becoming the trend in 1970s Formula One, the growth of the World Championship calendar, and ever inflating prize pots, caused a reduction in the number of non-Championship rounds. For 1974 there would be three F1 races staged outside of the World Championship, although the two events staged in the United Kingdom were open to Formula 5000 cars as well.

The full Non-Championship Race Schedule for 1974 is outlined below:

Date Event Circuit Report
3rd February Brazil I Grande Premio Presidente Emilio Medici Brasília Report
17th March United Kingdom IX Race of Champions Brands Hatch Report
7th April United Kingdom BRDC International Trophy Silverstone Report

Season ReviewEdit

The 1974 Formula One World Championship would be one of the tightest fought in F1 history, with three drivers heading into the final race with the chance of taking the crown.[7] Seven different drivers, and four separate constructors would taste victory across the fifteen Grand Prix, while several others got their first taste of F1.

Pre-SeasonEdit

1974 Argentine Grand PrixEdit

After a winter of reshuffling among the top teams, it was Lotus lead driver Ronnie Peterson who claimed the first pole of the season, carrying his form over from 1973.[1] The Swede immediately translated pole into an early lead off the start, while James Hunt sprinted up to second from fifth on the grid.[1] They escaped a three car pile up in the first corner that ended the chances of Jean-Pierre Jarier and Peter Revson, while Clay Regazzoni picked up damage.[1]

Hopes of a Hunt win disappeared before the end of the opening tour, the Brit pitching himself into a spin in the Hesketh.[1] That left Peterson with a small advantage over Carlos Reutemann, although the Argentine racer was in fine form in front of the home fans.[1] By lap three the Brabham had surged past the Lotus for the lead, sending the crowd into orbit.[1]

Brake troubles would deny Peterson a comeback, with the Swede slowly falling down the order after the opening laps.[1] Reutemann was left with a commanding lead, although as the race neared its conclusion the Argentine picked up a terminal misfire in his engine.[1] That allowed Denny Hulme to sweep past for the win on the penultimate tour, with Reutemann crawling to a stop half a lap later.[1] Niki Lauda therefore inherited second, his first podium finish on his Ferrari debut, while Regazzoni survived the run of retirements to claim third.[1]

1974 Brazilian Grand PrixEdit

Two weeks later and the field were assembled on the grid in São Paulo, with Emerson Fittipaldi, now of McLaren lining up on pole in front of the home crowd.[8] Unfortunately for him the clean side of the grid was not the place to be at the start, as Carlos Reutemann and Ronnie Peterson shot ahead.[8] Fittipaldi was left to stalk the leading pair in third, while Niki Lauda tumbled down the order with a misfire.[8]

Peterson pounced on Reutemann on lap four, a move that also opened the door for Fittipaldi to elbow the Argentine out of the way.[8] Reutemann was soon dropped by the former teammates and fell out of the points with tyre trouble, while Peterson fended off the former Team Lotus number one in one of the most exciting duels in recent years.[8] They were so evenly matched that it took the involvement of a third party, Arturo Merzario, to decide the fight, with Fittipaldi ultimately taking advantage of a slight hesitation from Peterson to scythe his way past the Swede and the lapped Italian to grab the lead.[8]

Fittipaldi soon escaped to claim a famous home victory in only his second race for McLaren, a late downpour ultimately ending the race eight laps prematurely.[8] Peterson was unable to respond after picking up a slow puncture, dropping him to sixth, while Clay Regazzoni claimed the lead in the World Championship by finishing second.[8] Jacky Ickx had a quiet afternoon to claim third ahead of Carlos Pace, while Mike Hailwood earned fifth from Peterson.[8]

1974 South African Grand PrixEdit

The start of the South African Grand Prix weekend would be marred by the death of Peter Revson, who had been killed at the Kyalami Circuit while testing for Shadow.[2] They withdrew from the meeting as a result, meaning more locals than expected were able to qualify for the race, including Ian Scheckter, brother of promising Tyrrell talent Jody.[2] Pole, meanwhile, had gone to Niki Lauda, a first for the Austrian race, while Arturo Merzario caused a stir by claiming third in the unloved Iso-Marlboro.[2]

Lauda led the field away from the grid at the start, followed by a surging Carlos Reutemann who shot into second.[2] Behind them came Pace, while Jody Scheckter got the home fans off their seats by shooting into fourth from eighth on the grid.[2] Behind there was a catastrophe for Lotus, as Ronnie Peterson suffered a throttle jam and slammed into teammate Jacky Ickx, sending both into the pits with damage.[2]

Lauda and Reutemann jostled for the lead through the opening laps, before the Argentine forced his way through on lap ten, a lead he would not relinquish.[2] Lauda would ultimately retire, suffering an identical failure to that of teammate Clay Regazzoni, handing Jean-Pierre Beltoise of BRM a shock second place finish after a late race charge.[2] Mike Hailwood blasted past teammate Emerson Fittipaldi to claim the final podium spot, with Patrick Depailler, Hans-Joachim Stuck and Merzario also taking the Brazilian as he faded with a tyre issue.[2]

1974 Spanish Grand PrixEdit

The first European race of the season would be punctured by huge crashes throughout, beginning with Patrick Depailler in practice and ending with Arturo Merzario in the race.[9] Both miraculously emerged from written off cars completely unharmed, with both cars crashing through the Armco barriers at the edge of the circuit.[9] Of the two accidents Merzario's was perhaps the most terrifying, as his car somersaulted over the barrier and landed among a group of photographers, who somehow managed to escape injury as well.[9]

Away from the carnage it was Niki Lauda who swept to pole for the second Grand Prix in a row, a race which would start in wet, but drying conditions.[9] The entire field lined up on the grid with wets on, although all of the drivers and teams knew they would be changing to slicks at some point during the 84 lap scrap.[9] The start itself was relatively tame, although a stunning run from Ronnie Peterson saw him leap into the lead into turn one.[9]

When it came to changing tyres it was the Ferrari team who came out on top, calling in both Lauda and Regazzoni at the perfect time to put them into a commanding position out front.[9] Peterson's lead was lost by a rare tactical blunder from Colin Chapman, although whether the Swede would have had any influence on the race from that point was ended by an engine failure.[9] Emerson Fittipaldi was left to claim third behind maiden race winner Lauda and Regazzoni, while Hans-Joachim Stuck, Jody Scheckter and Denny Hulme completed the scorers.[9]

1974 Belgian Grand PrixEdit

Clay Regazzoni claimed a rather suspect pole position for the Belgian Grand Prix two weeks after the race in Spain, the Swiss racer finding over a second over the rest of the field.[3] Controversy came from the fact that second placed Jody Scheckter, and Denny Hulme in twelfth were split by only three quarters of a second, with Regazzoni's teammate Niki Lauda among them.[3] An exceptional turn out saw thirty-two drivers attempt to qualify but only thirty-one start, privateer Leo Kinnunen the man to miss out.[3]

Regazzoni was able to convert his huge pole advantage into an equally stunning start, the Swiss racer opening out a one and a half second lead at the end of the first lap.[3] Emerson Fittipaldi battled with Scheckter for second on the opening tour, before chasing off after Regazzoni , but made very little progress.[3] Lauda then began to steal the show, scything past Ronnie Peterson and Scheckter before stalking Fittipaldi.[3]

The top five soon settled within sight of one-another, Regazzoni easing off the pace to keep his Ferrari in good condition.[3] Unfortunately this was a poor choice for the Swiss racer would spin while attempting to lap a backmarker, allowing Fittipaldi into an unassailable lead.[3] Lauda was also badly baulked in the melee, having to battle with Scheckter for second before the end of the race, while Regazzoni finished fourth ahead of Jean-Pierre Beltoise and Denny Hulme.[3]

1974 Monaco Grand PrixEdit

The annual visit to Monte Carlo saw Niki Lauda claim his third pole position of the season for Ferrari, sharing the front row with scarlet suited teammate Clay Regazzoni.[10] They duly sprinted away from the pack at the start of the race, and were two of a select few to avoid a huge pileup at Massanet.[10] An ambitious move from Denny Hulme was the cause, the Kiwi having bounced off the side of Jean-Pierre Beltoise before spinning to a stop in the middle of the circuit, blocking the road.[10]

The ensuing melee eliminated a further six drivers from the race, with the debris cleared from the circuit long before the leaders came through Sainte Devote to start the second lap.[10] The scarlet pair, Regazzoni ahead of Lauda, were on their toes as they came through the corner, not because of debris but rather a serious attempt from Jean-Pierre Jarier to put his Shadow into the lead.[10] His challenge was soon swatted away by the Ferrari's superior pace, although Regazzoni threw away thewin several laps later when he spun at Rascasse.[10]

Lauda inherited the lead, but he would be cruely denied a first triumph in Monte Carlo by an engine failure, joining a long list of casualties that had been the victims of either accident or mechanical strife.[10] Indeed, eventual race winner Ronnie Peterson was one of those carrying battle scars, his Lotus miraculously surviving a hit from Carlos Reutemann that was enough to eliminate the Brabham on the spot.[10] Jody Scheckter, in contrast, put his immaculate Tyrrell on the podium in second, while Jarier survived well to claim third.[10]

1974 Swedish Grand PrixEdit

The popularity of Ronnie Peterson had been enough to get the Swedish Grand Prix World Championship status in recent seasons, although the Swede was simply unable to repay the faith in qualifying, starting the race down in fifth.[11] Indeed, it was an all Tyrrell front row at the Scandinavian Raceway, with Patrick Depailler on pole ahead of teammate Jody Scheckter.[11] Unfortunately for Depailler, one lap pace was not enough to give him the lead at the start of the race, as he was dumped to third by his more fancied teammate and a hard charging Peterson.[11]

Patrick Depailler - 1974

Pole sitter Patrick Depailler tries to make up for his poor start.

Not to be deterred, Depailler fought back to make it a three way fight for the lead, Peterson's #1 Lotus and the Tyrrells soon pulling clear of the scarlet Ferraris which led the rest of the field.[11] Unfortunately the truel only lasted until the ninth lap, for Peterson dropped out with a transmission failure.[11] The two Tyrrells were left to do some formation flying for the rest of the afternoon, before Scheckter claimed his first victory less than half a second ahead of teammate Depailler.[11]

Away from the flying Tyrrells it was James Hunt who completed the podium, the Brit putting together an excellent run to climb through the order.[11] The two Ferraris disappeared with mechanical strife, Lauda lasting just long enough to prevent Hunt from catching the two Tyrrells, while Emerson Fittipaldi had a quiet run to fourth.[11] Jean-Pierre Jarier ended the day in fifth, while Graham Hill claimed a maiden points finish for his new Lola effort.[11]

1974 Dutch Grand PrixEdit

Qualifying for the Dutch Grand Prix would see Ferrari claim another front row lockout, as Niki Lauda and Clay Regazzoni dominated the rest of the field.[4] Lauda was the stronger of the pair and duly sprinted clear of the field at the start of the race, while Regazzoni was beaten into turn one by Mike Hailwood.[4] Behind James Hunt made a miserable start, misjudging his braking into turn one before collecting Tom Pryce's Shadow eliminating both.[4]

Dutch Grand Prix 1974 I

Niki Lauda leads the charge at Zandvoort.

There would be very little action of note from that point on, the only significant overtake coming early on when Regazzoni barged past Hailwood.[4] The two Ferraris duly pulled clear to claim a dominant one-two, while Hailwood ultimately slipped behind teammate Emerson Fittipaldi a few laps after Regazzoni blasted past.[4] The Brit himself would finish fourth ahead of Jody Scheckter, while Patrick Depailler survived a late charge by John Watson to claim sixth.[4]

1974 French Grand PrixEdit

Dijon-Prenois made its Grand Prix debut in 1974, although the incredibly short circuit did at least allow the order to be shuffled in qualifying.[12] That said, it was a fifth pole position for Niki Lauda come race morning, with Ronnie Peterson getting the ageing Lotus 72E on the front row.[12] Tom Pryce grabbed third for Shadow ahead of Clay Regazzoni, with two of the three McLarens lining up on the third row.[12]

Pryce's race would be over before the first corner, the Brit caught out while looking at his temperature gauge and was duly left by the leaders.[12] The Brit did get underway, but was instantly hit by Carlos Reutemann, a hit which pushed the Shadow straight into the path of James Hunt, meaning both Brits were out before the first corner for the second race in a row.[12] The rest of the field swarmed around the accident without issue, with Lauda leading Peterson and Regazzoni.[12]

Emerson Fittipaldi would be the centre of attention for a fair while, the Brazilian having lost ground at the start because of the accident unfolding directly ahead of him.[12] Peterson, meanwhile, kept Lauda on his toes through the opening laps, before barging past the Austrian on lap seventeen, a move that earned the Swede victory.[12] Lauda finished second ahead of teammate Regazzoni, who briefly fought with the charging Fittipaldi until the latter's engine expired.[12]

1974 British Grand PrixEdit

Lella Lombardi made history when she entered the British Grand Prix of 1974, her use of #208 as her race number the highest ever used at a World Championship meeting.[13] Unfortunately for Lombardi, the first woman since Maria Teresa de Filippis to enter a World Championship round, her number was not enough to get her a spot on the grid, which was limited to just twenty-five drivers.[13] Pole went, as was becoming increasingly usual, to Niki Lauda, while Ronnie Peterson grabbed second in front of Team Lotus' major sponsors.[13]

Lauda duly sprinted into an early lead at the start of the race, while Peterson slipped behind Jody Scheckter and Clay Regazzoni after a poor getaway.[13] Behind, the bet hopes for a home victory were ended when James Hunt made a poor start, with the Brit's subsequent comeback ended by a suspension failure on lap three.[13] A rather monotonous race then developed, until Hans-Joachim Stuck crashed at Dingle Dell and littered the circuit with bits of March.[13]

Scheckter Britain 1974

Jody Scheckter avoided puncture related misery to win at Brands Hatch.

Race leader Lauda was the first man on the scene of the accident, although he seemed to scrape through the scene without picking up a puncture.[13] It was not to be, however, for the Austrian instead got a slow puncture, which saw his pace decline as the race wore on.[13] Scheckter duly swept past in the closing stages to claim a maiden win, while Lauda stopped at the end of the penultimate lap as the tyre fell apart.[13]

However, the Austrian was not able to rejoin the race, for a crowd of officials and rival mechanics had gathered at the pit exit to await the arrival of Scheckter as race winner.[13] That cost Lauda a points finish, although he was later reinstated to fifth place after Ferrari appealed to the FIA.[13] Elsewhere both Peterson and Regazzoni had their races destroyed by punctures, meaning Emerson Fittipaldi and Jacky Ickx ended the day on the podium.[13]

1974 German Grand PrixEdit

A weekend marred by huge accidents awaited the field as the gathered at the fearsome Nürburgring, as Howden Ganley and Mike Hailwood suffered career ending injuries.[5] The first saw Ganley, at the wheel of the new-for-1974 Maki, a suspension failure sending his car straight into the barriers during practice.[5] During the race, Hailwood would suffer a similar problem in his McLaren, the Brit smashing into the barriers at Pfanzgarten with enough force to break both his legs.[5]

Qualifying had seen Niki Lauda once again claim pole position, although it was his teammate Clay Regazzoni who led the field through turn one.[5] Lauda himself was left to fight with Jody Scheckter for second, and in his attempts to retake the position the Austrian spin himself into the barriers, ending his race well before the end of the first lap.[5] Scheckter continued with some battle scars but was otherwise fine, while Carlos Reutemann fought off a fast starting Jochen Mass to hold third.[5]

Indeed, Mass would be the centre of attention for most of the race, engaging with both Loti of Jacky Ickx and Ronnie Peterson for most of the race.[5] Unfortunately for the 300,000 strong crowd, Mass' race would be ended by mechanical strife, leaving the Loti to fight amongst themselves.[5] Out front, meanwhile, Regazzoni was able to cruise to his first win of the season and the World Championship lead, while Scheckter and Reutemann completed the podium after similarly quiet afternoons.[5]

1974 Austrian Grand PrixEdit

Given it was his home race, one would expect the pressure to get to Niki Lauda and ruin his recent run of pole positions.[14] Unfortunately for the rest of the field, the ever hard working Austrian duly put his Ferrari on pole once again, sharing the front row with Carlos Reutemann.[14] His form would not carry over into the race, however, as it was Reutemann who sprinted into the lead at the start.[14]

Clay Regazzoni became the highlight of the race over the following laps, the Swiss racer carving his way up to third to make up for his terrible grid slot of eighth.[14] But, as the Championship leader climbed the order, teammate Lauda was left heartbroken, for a misfire had developed in his F12 engine, forcing him into the pits.[14] Regazzoni was therefore promoted to second, although Reutemann had already escaped up the road by the time the Swiss racer had cleared Carlos Pace.[14]

Whether Regazzoni would catch the Argentine would become academic a few laps later, as the #12 Ferrari developed a crippling slow puncture.[14] Reutemann was left to claim victory, while his new teammate Pace moved through to second, only to pull off moments later with a split fuel pipe.[14] Ronnie Peterson inherited the position before suffering a gearbox failure, meaning it was Denny Hulme who picked up second, ahead of James Hunt in the Hesketh.[14]

1974 Italian Grand PrixEdit

The final European race of the season was staged at Monza, with the tifosi coming out in force in hopes of seeing the revived Ferrari team claim victory.[15] The weekend started well, for Niki Lauda claimed pole while Championship leader Clay Regazzoni started from fifth, ahead of the pair's two title rivals Emerson Fittipaldi and Jody Scheckter.[15] Hopes further climbed in the early stages of the race, with Lauda immediately sprinting into the lead, while Regazzoni carved his way up the order to second.[15]

Brabham were the second best team at Monza, and the only ones who had seriously threatened the scarlet duo in qualifying.[15] In the race, however, their challenge fell apart with mechanical strife, and so the two Ferraris were left with victory in their collective grasp.[15] For Lauda, however, it was not to be, for his engine erupted in blue smoke after half distance, a failure that prompted Regazzoni to reduce his pace.[15]

It was a decision made in vain, however, for just ten laps after Lauda's engine failed Regazzoni was sat on the sidelines after an identical demise.[15] Ronnie Peterson and Fittipaldi were left to duel for the lead for the rest of the afternoon, a well mannered fight ending with the Swede on top.[15] Fittipaldi's second place saw him cut the gap in the World Championship, while third place for Scheckter put him right in the middle of the four way title fight.[15]

1974 Canadian Grand PrixEdit

Four drivers arrived with hopes of taking the title come seasons end when the field arrived at Mosport Park, and it was Emerson Fittipaldi who earned first blood as he claimed pole.[6] At the start it was Niki Lauda, however, who sprinted into the lead, the Austrian needing to win the race to keep any hopes of taking the title alive.[6] Fittipaldi led the rest of the field from second, with immediate title rivals Clay Regazzoni and Jody Scheckter right behind him.[6]

The top four soon pulled clear of the rest of the field, with Scheckter leaping past Regazzoni on the third lap.[6] Unfortunately for him his race would end with a visit to the barriers just after half distance, the Tyrrell suffering a brake failure.[6] Then, Lauda's title challenge came to a dismal end as the Austrian hit debris, damaged his suspension, and ultimately slammed into the barriers.[6]

Fittipaldi inherited the lead with Regazzoni in second, although both were being caught by Ronnie Peterson hand over fist.[6] Unfortunately for him time would run out, with victory heading the way of Fittipaldi while second place went to Regazzoni.[6] Those two headed into the season finale level on points (52 apiece), while Scheckter headed to "the Glen" on 45.[6] Lauda, meanwhile, was out.

1974 United States Grand PrixEdit

The now three way title fight arrived in Watkins Glen, knowing that Jody Scheckter had to win the race and see his two rivals finish sixth or lower in order to win.[7] For Emerson Fittipaldi and Clay Regazzoni it was a case of whoever finished higher in the points, although in truth the gloss of the finale was overshadowed by a gruesome accident.[7] The victim was the inexperienced Austrian racer Helmuth Koinigg, who crashed through the Armco barriers at turn seven and suffered severe head trauma.[7]

Away from the horrible accident it was Carlos Reutemann who claimed pole for the finale, with the Argentine duly sprinting into an early lead from the start.[7] Mario Andretti had been set to star after qualifying third on the grid, but his Parnelli failed to move off the grid.[7] He was later disqualified after his crew started the car from the pitlane, as the title fight moved to the centre of everyone's attentions.[7]

It was advantage Fittipaldi from the opening stages of the race, for Scheckter was unable to keep pace with the top four, Reutemann, James Hunt, Carlos Pace and Niki Lauda, while Regazzoni was running behind the Brazilian from the first lap onwards.[7] Indeed, things only got better for the McLaren racer, as Regazzoni faded with handling issues (which resulted in two visits to the pits) while Scheckter retired late on.[7] With those two out of the way the Brazilian could cruise to the chequered flag, a fourth place finish enough to see him crowned Champion for the second time.[7]

Victory, meanwhile, went to Reutemann, who led home his charging Brabham teammate Pace who had blasted past Hunt when the Brit hit mechanical strife.[7] Lauda dropped away with suspension damage to leave Fittipaldi fourth, while John Watson claimed fifth in the third Brabham.[7] Arturo Merzario looked set to claim the final point of the season until his onboard extinguisher went off, meaning Patrick Depailler ended the season with a sixth place finish.[7]

Non-Championship RoundsEdit

ResultsEdit

There were seven different winners representing five constructors who picked up wins in 1974, a score card that highlighted the 1974 season as one of the most competitive in F1 history. Victories were spread across the field too, from the veteran Denny Hulme through to relative rookie Jody Scheckter, the former claiming his last triumph while Scheckter earned his first.

World Championship Grand PrixEdit

A run down of results for the 1974 FIA Formula One World Championship is shown below:

Round Event Report
Grid Result
1 Argentina Argentine Grand Prix Report
Sweden Ronnie Peterson
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
1 New Zealand Denny Hulme
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
Fastest Lap
Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
2 Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
3 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
1:52.10 on Lap 38
2 Brazil Brazilian Grand Prix Report
Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
1 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
Fastest Lap
Argentina Carlos Reutemann
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
2 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
3 Belgium Jacky Ickx
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
2:36.05 on Lap 26
3 South Africa South African Grand Prix Report
Switzerland Niki Lauda
Ferrari
1 Argentina Carlos Reutemann
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
Fastest Lap
Brazil Carlos Pace
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
2 France Jean-Pierre Beltoise
BRM
Argentina Carlos Reutemann
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
Italy Arturo Merzario
Iso-Marlboro-Ford Cosworth
3 United Kingdom Mike Hailwood
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
1:18.16 on Lap 58
4 Spain Spanish Grand Prix Report
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
1 Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
Fastest Lap
Sweden Ronnie Peterson
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
2 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
3 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
1:20.83 on Lap 47
5 Belgium Belgian Grand Prix Report
Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
1 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
Fastest Lap
South Africa Jody Scheckter
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
2 Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
New Zealand Denny Hulme
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
3 South Africa Jody Scheckter
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
1:11.31 on Lap 37
6 Monaco Monaco Grand Prix Report
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
1 Sweden Ronnie Peterson
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
Fastest Lap
Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
2 South Africa Jody Scheckter
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
Sweden Ronnie Peterson
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
Sweden Ronnie Peterson
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
3 France Jean-Pierre Jarier
Shadow-Ford Cosworth
1:27.9 on Lap 57
7 Sweden Swedish Grand Prix Report
France Patrick Depailler
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
1 South Africa Jody Scheckter
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
Fastest Lap
South Africa Jody Scheckter
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
2 France Patrick Depailler
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
France Patrick Depailler
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
3 United Kingdom James Hunt
Hesketh-Ford Cosworth
1:27.262 on Lap 72
8 Netherlands Dutch Grand Prix Report
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
1 Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
Fastest Lap
Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
2 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
Sweden Ronnie Peterson
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
3 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
1:21.44 on Lap 63
9 France French Grand Prix Report
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
1 Sweden Ronnie Peterson
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
Fastest Lap
Sweden Ronnie Peterson
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
2 Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
South Africa Jody Scheckter
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
United Kingdom Tom Pryce
Shadow-Ford Cosworth
3 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
1:00.00 on Lap 10
10 United Kingdom British Grand Prix Report
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
1 South Africa Jody Scheckter
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
Fastest Lap
Sweden Ronnie Peterson
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
2 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
South Africa Jody Scheckter
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
3 Belgium Jacky Ickx
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
1:21.1 on Lap 25
11 West Germany German Grand Prix Report
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
1 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
Fastest Lap
Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
2 South Africa Jody Scheckter
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
South Africa Jody Scheckter
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
3 Argentina Carlos Reutemann
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
7:11.1 on Lap 11
12 Austria Austrian Grand Prix Report
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
1 Argentina Carlos Reutemann
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
Fastest Lap
Argentina Carlos Reutemann
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
2 New Zealand Denny Hulme
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
3 United Kingdom James Hunt
Hesketh-Ford Cosworth
1:37.22 on Lap 46
13 Italy Italian Grand Prix Report
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
1 Sweden Ronnie Peterson
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
Fastest Lap
Argentina Carlos Reutemann
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
2 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
Brazil Carlos Pace
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
Brazil Carlos Pace
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
3 South Africa Jody Scheckter
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
1:34.2 on Lap 46
14 Canada Canadian Grand Prix Report
Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
1 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi
McLaren-Ford Cosworth
Fastest Lap
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
2 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni
Ferrari
Austria Niki Lauda
Ferrari
South Africa Jody Scheckter
Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth
3 Sweden Ronnie Peterson
Lotus-Ford Cosworth
1:13.659 on Lap 60
15 United States United States Grand Prix Report
Argentina Carlos Reutemann
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
1 Argentina Carlos Reutemann
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
Fastest Lap
United Kingdom James Hunt
Hesketh-Ford Cosworth
2 Brazil Carlos Pace
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
Brazil Carlos Pace
Brabham-Ford Cosworth
United States Mario Andretti
Parnelli-Ford Cosworth
3 United Kingdom James Hunt
Hesketh-Ford Cosworth
1:40.608 on Lap 54

Non-Championship Grand PrixEdit

Final StandingsEdit

Two titles were up for grabs in 1974: The FIA Formula One World Championship for Drivers', and the International Cup for Manufacturers.

Drivers' World ChampionshipEdit

With three victories to his name it was 1972 World Champion Emerson Fittipaldi who was declared 1974 Champion, having scored a grand total of 55 points. Clay Regazzoni, having led the title hunt at various times in the season finished runner up, while Jody Scheckter ended his first full F1 season in third with two wins. A disappointed Niki Lauda finished the season in fourth having matched Ronnie Peterson's record of nine pole positions in a single season. The Swede himself would complete the top five having won three races, while fellow race winners Carlos Reutemann and Denny Hulme finished sixth and seventh.

The full World Championship standings for the 1974 season are shown below:

Pos. Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Pts.*
Flag of Argentina Flag of Brazil (1968–1992) Flag of South Africa 1928-1994 Flag of Spain 1945 1977 Flag of Belgium Flag of Monaco Flag of Sweden Flag of the Netherlands Flag of France Flag of Great Britain Flag of Germany Flag of Austria Flag of Italy Flag of Canada Flag of the United States
1st Emerson Fittipaldi 10th 1st 7th 3rd 1st 5th 4th 3rd Ret 2nd Ret Ret 2nd 1st 4th 55
2nd Clay Regazzoni 3rd 2nd Ret 2nd 4th 4th Ret 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 5th Ret 2nd 11th 52
3rd Jody Scheckter Ret 13th 8th 5th 3rd 2nd 1st 5th 4th 1st 2nd Ret 3rd Ret Ret 45
4th Niki Lauda 2nd Ret 16th 1st 2nd Ret Ret 1st 2nd 5th Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 38
5th Ronnie Peterson 13th 6th Ret Ret Ret 1st Ret 8th 1st 10th 4th Ret 1st 3rd Ret 35
6th Carlos Reutemann 7th 7th 1st Ret Ret Ret Ret 12th Ret 6th 3rd 1st Ret 9th 1st 32
7th Denny Hulme 1st 12th 9th 6th 6th Ret Ret Ret 6th 7th DSQ 2nd 6th 6th Ret 20
8th James Hunt Ret 9th Ret 10th Ret Ret 3rd Ret Ret Ret Ret 3rd Ret 4th 3rd 15
9th Patrick Depailler 6th 8th 4th 8th Ret 9th 2nd 6th 8th Ret Ret Ret 11th 5th 6th 14
10th Jacky Ickx Ret 3rd Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 11th 5th 3rd 5th Ret Ret 13th Ret 12
11th Mike Hailwood 4th 5th 3rd 9th 7th Ret Ret 4th 7th Ret 15th 12
12th Carlos Pace Ret 4th 11th 13th Ret Ret Ret DNQ 9th 12th Ret 5th 8th 2nd 11
13th Jean-Pierre Beltoise 5th 10th 2nd Ret 5th Ret Ret Ret 10th 12th Ret Ret Ret NC DNQ 10
14th Jean-Pierre Jarier Ret Ret Ret 13th 3rd 5th Ret 12th Ret 8th 8th Ret Ret 10th 6
15th John Watson 12th Ret Ret 11th 11th 6th 11th 7th 16th 11th Ret 4th 7th Ret 5th 6
16th Hans-Joachim Stuck Ret Ret 5th 4th Ret Ret Ret DNQ Ret 7th 11th Ret Ret DNQ 5
17th Arturo Merzario Ret Ret 6th Ret Ret Ret DNS Ret 9th Ret Ret Ret 4th Ret Ret 4
18th Graham Hill Ret 11th 12th Ret 8th 7th 6th Ret 13th 13th 9th 12th 8th 14th 8th 1
19th Tom Pryce Ret Ret Ret 8th 6th Ret 10th Ret NC 1
20th Vittorio Brambilla 10th 9th Ret 10th 10th 11th Ret 13th 6th Ret DNQ Ret 1
Guy Edwards 11th Ret DNQ 12th 8th 7th Ret 15th DNQ 0
David Hobbs 7th 9th 0
Jochen Mass Ret 17th Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 14th Ret 16th 7th 0
Brian Redman 7th 18th Ret 0
Mario Andretti 7th DSQ 0
Howden Ganley 8th Ret DNQ DNQ 0
Tom Belsø Ret DNQ 8th DNQ 0
Rikky von Opel DNS Ret Ret DNQ 9th 9th DNQ 0
Henri Pescarolo 9th 14th 18th 12th Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 10th Ret 0
Chris Amon Ret DNS DNQ DNQ NC 9th 0
Dieter Quester 9th 0
Tim Schenken 14th 10th Ret DNQ Ret DNQ 10th Ret DSQ 0
Helmuth Koinigg DNQ 10th Ret 0
Rolf Stommelen Ret Ret 11th 12th 0
Derek Bell DNQ 11th DNQ DNQ DNQ 0
Mark Donohue 12th Ret 0
Ian Scheckter 13th DNQ 0
François Migault Ret 16th 15th Ret 16th Ret Ret 14th NC DNQ Ret 0
Ian Ashley 14th NC DNQ DNQ 0
Gijs van Lennep 14th DNQ 0
Eddie Keizan 14th 0
Richard Robarts Ret 15th 17th DNS 0
Vern Schuppan 15th Ret DSQ DSQ DNQ DNQ Ret 0
Jacques Laffite Ret NC Ret 15th Ret 0
Teddy Pilette 17th 0
Dave Charlton 19th 0
Peter Revson Ret Ret 0
Leo Kinnunen DNQ Ret DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ 0
Mike Wilds DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ NC 0
Gérard Larrousse Ret DNQ 0
Paddy Driver Ret 0
Reine Wisell Ret 0
Bertil Roos Ret} 0
Peter Gethin Ret 0
Eppie Wietzes Ret 0
José Dolhem DNQ DNQ WD 0
David Purley DNQ 0
Lella Lombardi DNQ 0
John Nicholson DNQ 0
Larry Perkins DNQ 0
Carlo Facetti DNQ 0
Pos. Driver Flag of Argentina Flag of Brazil (1968–1992) Flag of South Africa 1928-1994 Flag of Spain 1945 1977 Flag of Belgium Flag of Monaco Flag of Sweden Flag of the Netherlands Flag of France Flag of Great Britain Flag of Germany Flag of Austria Flag of Italy Flag of Canada Flag of the United States Pts.*
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  • * Only the 7 best results from the first 8 races and the best 6 results from the remaining 7 races counted to a driver's points tally.

International Cup for ManufacturersEdit

McLaren-Ford Cosworth and Ferrari had duelled for the International Cup for Manufacturers' title throughout 1974, and it would be the former who walked away with the crown come seasons end. Indeed, the British squad were the only team to have a dropped score, and claimed a points finish in all bar one of the seasons races, taking four wins. Ferrari finished as runners-up with three wins across the season, while Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth ended the year in third after two victories. Lotus-Ford Cosworth ended their title defence with three wins but only fourth in standings, while Brabham-Ford Cosworth completed the winners list and the top five with two wins.

The full results for the 1974 International Cup for Manufacturers' are shown below:

Pos. Constructor 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Pts.*
Flag of Argentina Flag of Brazil (1968–1992) Flag of South Africa 1928-1994 Flag of Spain 1945 1977 Flag of Belgium Flag of Monaco Flag of Sweden Flag of the Netherlands Flag of France Flag of Great Britain Flag of Germany Flag of Austria Flag of Italy Flag of Canada Flag of the United States
1st McLaren-Ford Cosworth 1st 1st 3rd 3rd 1st 5th 4th 3rd 6th 2nd 15th 2nd 2nd 1st 4th 73 (75)
2nd Ferrari 2nd 2nd 16th 1st 2nd 4th Ret 1st 2nd 4th 1st 5th Ret 2nd 11th 65
3rd Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 6th 8th 4th 5th 3rd 2nd 1st 5th 4th 1st 2nd Ret 3rd 5th 6th 52
4th Lotus-Ford Cosworth 13th 3rd 13th Ret Ret 1st Ret 8th 1st 3rd 4th Ret 1st 3rd Ret 42
5th Brabham-Ford Cosworth 7th 7th 1st 11th 11th 6th 9th 7th 16th 6th 3rd 1st 5th 8th 1st 35
6th Hesketh-Ford Cosworth Ret 10th Ret Ret 3rd Ret Ret Ret Ret 3rd Ret 4th 3rd 15
7th BRM 5th 10th 2nd 12th 5th Ret Ret Ret 10th 12th 10th Ret Ret NC 9th 10
8th Shadow-Ford Cosworth Ret Ret WD 7th 13th 3rd 5th Ret 12th 8th 6th 8th 10th Ret 10th 7
9th March-Ford Cosworth 8th 9th 5th 4th 9th Ret 10th 10th 11th Ret 7th 6th Ret Ret Ret 6
10th Iso-Marlboro-Ford Cosworth Ret Ret 6th Ret 14th Ret 8th Ret 9th Ret Ret NC 4th 15th Ret 4
11th Surtees-Ford Cosworth Ret 4th 11th 13th Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 14th 11th 9th DNQ 10th Ret 3
12th Lola-Ford Cosworth 11th 11th 12th Ret 8th 7th 6th Ret 13th 13th 9th 12th 8th 11th 8th 1
Parnelli-Ford Cosworth 7th DSQ 0
Trojan-Ford Cosworth 14th 10th Ret DNQ Ret DNQ 10th Ret 0
Penske-Ford Cosworth 12th Ret 0
Token-Ford Cosworth Ret DNQ 14th NC 0
Ensign-Ford Cosworth DNS 15th Ret DSQ DSQ DNQ DNQ Ret DNQ DNQ DNQ NC 0
Amon-Ford Cosworth Ret DNS DNQ DNQ 0
Maki-Ford Cosworth DNQ DNQ 0
Lyncar-Ford Cosworth DNQ 0
Pos. Driver Flag of Argentina Flag of Brazil (1968–1992) Flag of South Africa 1928-1994 Flag of Spain 1945 1977 Flag of Belgium Flag of Monaco Flag of Sweden Flag of the Netherlands Flag of France Flag of Great Britain Flag of Germany Flag of Austria Flag of Italy Flag of Canada Flag of the United States Pts.*
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  • * Only the 7 best results from the first 8 races and the best 6 results from the remaining 7 races counted to a constructor's points tally.

ReferencesEdit

Images and Videos:

References:
  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: ARGENTINE GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr236.html, (Accessed 11/03/2017)
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: SOUTH AFRICAN GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr238.html, (Accessed 16/03/2017)
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: BELGIAN GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr240.html, (Accessed 24/03/2017)
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: DUTCH GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr243.html, (Accessed 01/04/2017)
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: GERMAN GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr246.html, (Accessed 30/04/2017)
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: CANADIAN GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2015), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr249.html, (Accessed 10/05/2017)
  7. 7.00 7.01 7.02 7.03 7.04 7.05 7.06 7.07 7.08 7.09 7.10 7.11 7.12 7.13 7.14 7.15 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: UNITED STATES GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2015), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr250.html, (Accessed 17/05/2017)
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: BRAZILIAN GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr237.html, (Accessed 13/03/2017)
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 9.8 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: SPANISH GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr239.html, (Accessed 20/03/2017)
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.6 10.7 10.8 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: MONACO GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr241.html, (Accessed 26/03/2017)
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: SWEDISH GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr242.html, (Accessed 30/03/2017)
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5 12.6 12.7 12.8 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: FRENCH GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr244.html, (Accessed 26/04/2017)
  13. 13.00 13.01 13.02 13.03 13.04 13.05 13.06 13.07 13.08 13.09 13.10 13.11 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: BRITISH GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr245.html, (Accessed 28/04/2017)
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: AUSTRIAN GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr247.html, (Accessed 04/05/2017)
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 15.5 15.6 15.7 15.8 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: ITALIAN GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2015), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr248.html, (Accessed 08/05/2017)
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