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The 1974 Canadian Grand Prix, otherwise officially known as the XIV Canadian Grand Prix, was the fourteenth and penultimate round of the 1974 FIA Formula One World Championship, staged at Mosport Park on the 22nd September.[1] The race, which saw a smaller entry list than normal due to the costs of travelling across the Atlantic, would see Niki Lauda's title bid come to a dramatic end while leading in the closing stages.[1]

The Austrian racer was among four drivers still in the hunt to win the World Championship, and was only denied pole by less than 0.050s in qualifying.[1] The man to deny him would be another title challenger in the form of Emerson Fittipaldi, while the third pretender Jody Scheckter claimed third.[1] Championship leader Clay Regazzoni, meanwhile, would start from sixth behind Carlos Reutemann and Jean-Pierre Jarier.[1]

Despite missing out on pole, there was no stopping the Austrian at the start of the race on Sunday, the #12 Ferrari duly sprinting into an early lead off the line.[1] Fittipaldi led the charge to catch him from second, while a perfect start for Regazzoni saw him surge into third, ahead of Scheckter who dropped to fourth.[1]

The top four began to pull away from the rest of the field, with Scheckter leaping ahead of Regazzoni during the third lap.[1] The Swiss racer then began to fall back from the group, but would be under no threat from fifth placed James Hunt, up from eighth on the grid.[1] Indeed, the top four remained unchanged through to half distance, with Lauda inching ahead of Fittipaldi and Scheckter as the race wore on.[1]

Things looked set to go to the wire in the United States with three drivers on 49 points, Lauda on 47, only for things to unravel out front.[1] The first incident removed, Scheckter, a brake failure sending him barrelling into the barriers on lap 49.[1] The South African racer emerged with some bruising but was otherwise fine, as Regazzoni's promotion to third place put the Swiss racer back on top of the Championship standings.[1]

Twenty laps later and it was over for Lauda, with the Austrian's Ferrari disappearing into the barriers having led every lap.[1] The Austrian had hit some debris that smashed his suspension, and as he barrelled into the barriers he knew his title fight was over.[1] That left Fittipaldi and Regazzoni out at the head of the field, although the now third placed Ronnie Peterson was catching the pair of them at a rate of knots.[1]

Ultimately, time ran out for the Swede, who was a little over a second behind Regazzoni when the Swiss racer crossed the line to claim second.[1] Fittipaldi claimed victory and the lead in the Championship, level on points with Regazzoni with one race to go, while Scheckter slipped to third, seven points behind.[1] Lauda was too far back, fourteen points away from the leading duo with nine left to fight for at the season finale in Watkins Glen.[1]

BackgroundEdit

The news ahead of the Canadian Grand Prix at Mosport Park was dominated by the decision of the FIA to reverse the exclusion of Niki Lauda at the British Grand Prix.[2] Their decision effectively brought Lauda back into the title fight, for he gained two points to move back within nine points of Championship leader Clay Regazzoni.[2] Although there was a lot of muttering about this decision no further protests were raised, meaning it would certainly be a four way fight for the Championship in Canada.[2]

Away from the FIA's appeasement of Ferrari, attention focused on two American "garagista" attempts that made a relatively short hop over the Canadian/American boarder to make their debuts.[2] Both Parnelli and Penske had enjoyed success at America's biggest race, the Indianapolis 500, and with major financial backing both decided to try their hand in Formula One, using the Ford Cosworth engine as a basis.[2]

The Parnelli VPJ4, to be piloted by the familiar face of Mario Andretti, attracted the most interest having been designed by Maurice Phillipe.[2] The Frenchman's design followed the venerable Lotus 72 as most modern Grand Prix cars did, and sported a strikingly similar rear suspension design to the Lotus 76.[2] Various other elements were borrowed from elsewhere, with aircraft style snap-on joints on most parts, as well as a one-way valve system for the brakes and clutch fluid lines that meant the team did not have to spend time bleeding the system.[2]

In contrast, the Penske PC1 provided for Mark Donohue was very conventional, reflecting the design of the British based "garagistas" that had been racing all season.[2] Former Brabham designer Geoff Ferris had led the project, and been a big factor in moving the Penske's radiators to the middle of the sidepods.[2] Otherwise the car was best described as a Brabham/Lotus fusion, with elements of both being infused to produce the #66 car on the Canadian grid.[2]

Of the British "garagistas", only Ensign and Hesketh made the trip across the Atlantic, although the decision did put both further into their respective financial holes.[2] For Ensign, their yellow-green machine was to be piloted by Mike Wilds, with no significant updates or any spares.[2] James Hunt would pilot the more competitive Hesketh, with a spare brought along in hopes that they could loan it out to a local in either Canada or America.[2]

Into the full time efforts and a fairly happy Ferrari team arrived after their disastrous race in Italy, with Lauda and Regazzoni getting three cars for their adventure in North America.[2] Rivals McLaren made a change to their line-up, dropping the veteran David Hobbs in favour of free agent Jochen Mass, with the German taking over the Yardley sponsored M23.[2] Title pretender Emerson Fittipaldi and Denny Hulme used the newest of the M23s in Team Texaco Marlboro colours.[2]

At Lotus it had been decided that the 72E was the car to use until the end of the season, with the team's last two chassis shipped over the Atlantic along with a single 76.[2] Ronnie Peterson was fairly optimistic of a strong end to the season, despite being realistically out of the title fight, while teammate Jacky Ickx seemed a shade of his former self.[2] Arch rivals Tyrrell had also had a reshuffle of their compliment of 007s, with Jody Scheckter getting the newest car, while Patrick Depailler inherited the South African's race winning chassis.[2]

Bernie Ecclestone's Brabham effort arrived with an advantage in numbers in Canada, with no fewer than six cars and five drivers representing the former Champions.[2] Leading the way were the three works BT44s for Carlos Reutemann and Carlos Pace, backed by the fourth BT44 being run for Hexagon of Highgate racer John Watson.[2] Eppie Wietzes loaned the latter's spare BT42 for the weekend, making his return to Formula One after his appearance at the 1973 Canadian Grand Prix as the driver of the infamous "safety" car.[2] The fifth Brabham peddler would be Ian Ashley, whose BT42 was littered with the Brit's private sponsors.[2]

Surtees were, in contrast, in a miserable mind ahead of the trip across the Atlantic, reeling in the wake of the complete severing ties with Mass in recent weeks.[2] Derek Bell continued to lead the team on track, backed by Helmuth Koinigg who had impressed in Austria.[2] The future of the team remained in doubt, although John Surtees refused to comment on various rumours circulating the paddock.

Attempting to rival the Surtees discontent were BRM, whose terrible 1974 campaign had seen their all French line-up finally broken up.[2] Henri Pescarolo was shown the door after the Italian Grand Prix, while François Migault refused to make the trip at all.[2] That left the team with just a single driver in the form of team leader Jean-Pierre Beltoise, although they quickly secured the services of Chris Amon who had originally made the journey to North America as a spectator.[2]

The American licensed, but British built, Shadow team were optimistic ahead of their home tour, with Tom Pryce and Jean-Pierre Jarier continuing as their drivers.[2] Frank Williams was happy enough with his pair of Arturo Merzario and Jacques Laffite, although a lack of recent development on the Iso-Marlboros was cause for concern.[2] Lola completed the field with Graham Hill contemplating his future as a racer, although he would race alongside recent addition Rolf Stommelen.[2]

With Championship leader Regazzoni failing to score, victory allowed Peterson to stay in the hunt for the title, although he still needed to win both of the remaining races with the Swiss racer failing to finish above fourth in either. The Swede therefore took over Scheckter's mantle of being the dark horse, for the South African had closed to within a point of Regazzoni after claiming a podium spot, while Fittipaldi moved into third and closed to within three points of the Swiss. Lauda remained eight points back in fourth, and could be the first of the quartet to drop out of the fight if he failed to win in Canada.

After their double retirement at their home race, Ferrari dropped behind rivals McLaren-Ford Cosworth in the International Cup for Manufacturers' table, the British squad leaving Monza two points clear of the Italians. Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth slipped slightly further back, now twelve points off the lead with eighteen points left to fight for, meaning they could drop out of the hunt in Canada. Lotus-Ford Cosworth could theoretically catch their rivals and claim third, but needed to overcome an eleven point deficit, while Brabham-Ford Cosworth had further reinforced their fifth place in the standings.

Entry listEdit

The full entry list for the 1974 Canadian Grand Prix is outlined below:

No. Driver Entreat Constructor Car Engine Model Tire
1 Sweden Ronnie Peterson United Kingdom John Player Team Lotus Lotus 72E Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
2 Belgium Jacky Ickx United Kingdom John Player Team Lotus Lotus 72E Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
3 South Africa Jody Scheckter United Kingdom Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 007 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
4 France Patrick Depailler United Kingdom Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 007 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
5 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi United Kingdom Marlboro Team Texaco McLaren M23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
6 New Zealand Denny Hulme United Kingdom Marlboro Team Texaco McLaren M23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
7 Argentina Carlos Reutemann United Kingdom Motor Racing Developments Brabham BT44 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
8 Brazil Carlos Pace United Kingdom Motor Racing Developments Brabham BT44 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
9 Germany Hans-Joachim Stuck United Kingdom March Engineering March 741 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
10 Italy Vittorio Brambilla United Kingdom March Engineering March 741 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
11 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312B3-74 Ferrari 001/11 3.0 F12 G
12 Austria Niki Lauda Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 312B3-74 Ferrari 001/11 3.0 F12 G
14 France Jean-Pierre Beltoise United Kingdom Team Motul BRM BRM P201 BRM P200 3.0 V12 F
15 New Zealand Chris Amon United Kingdom Team Motul BRM BRM P201 BRM P200 3.0 V12 F
16 United Kingdom Tom Pryce United States UOP Shadow Racing Team Shadow DN3 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
17 France Jean-Pierre Jarier United States UOP Shadow Racing Team Shadow DN3 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
18 United Kingdom Derek Bell United Kingdom Team Surtees Surtees TS16 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F
19 Austria Helmuth Koinigg United Kingdom Team Surtees Surtees TS16 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F
20 Italy Arturo Merzario United Kingdom Frank Williams Racing Cars Iso-Marlboro FW Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F
21 France Jacques Laffite United Kingdom Frank Williams Racing Cars Iso-Marlboro FW Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F
22 United Kingdom Mike Wilds United Kingdom Team Ensign Ensign N174 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F
24 United Kingdom James Hunt United Kingdom Hesketh Racing Hesketh 308 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
26 United Kingdom Graham Hill United Kingdom Embassy Racing with Graham Hill Lola T370 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F
27 West Germany Rolf Stommelen United Kingdom Embassy Racing with Graham Hill Lola T370 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F
28 United Kingdom John Watson United Kingdom John Goldie Racing with Hexagon Brabham BT44 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F
33 West Germany Jochen Mass United Kingdom Yardley Team McLaren McLaren M23 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
37 France François Migault United Kingdom Team Motul BRM BRM P201 BRM P200 3.0 V12 F
42 United Kingdom Ian Ashley United Kingdom The Chequered Flag Brabham BT42 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
50 Canada Eppie Wietzes Canada Team Canada F1 Racing Brabham BT42 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
55 United States Mario Andretti United States Vel's Parnelli Jones Racing Parnelli VPJ4 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F
66 United States Mark Donohue United States Penske Cars Penske PC1 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G
Source:[3]

Practice OverviewEdit

QualifyingEdit

Practice/qualifying was to be split into four sessions, shared equally across Friday and Saturday afternoons.[2] Weather wise it would be consistently dry across the two days, a surprise given the fact that it was getting towards early autumn in Canada at a circuit which had a history of getting a soaking.[2] As for target times, the circuit record of 1:13.697 set by Ronnie Peterson on his way to pole was seen as a realistic one, particularly as large parts of the circuit had been resurfaced to make it less bumpy.[2]

ReportEdit

Unknown to anyone bar those running the event, the timekeepers decided to use an older set of timing equipment during the first session, which only recorded times to the nearest tenth.[2] This fact almost instantly became an issue during the opening practice/qualifying session of the weekend, as a quick blast by the Brabham team saw their two drivers record times within a tenth of each other.[2] Moments later and Clay Regazzoni matched Carlos Reutemann's time, with Niki Lauda, Jody Scheckter and James Hunt all getting close to Carlos Pace's best effort of 1:14.1 before the end of the session.[2]

Elsewhere, Shadow were left scratching their heads over a terminally wounded engine in Jean-Pierre Jarier's car, which had exploded in the garage, while Chris Amon completed a handful of laps in the BRM before announcing, rather bluntly, that it was undrivable.[2] These, however, were trivial compared to the terrible run Jacky Ickx was enduring at Lotus, the Belgian managing to bounce his 72E into the barrier, before a seized break on the 76 left him sat in the garage for most of the day.[2]

For the second run on Friday, the timekeepers had wheeled out their electronic timing system, capable of recording times to the nearest thousandth.[2] The improved equipment duly proved its worth during the second session, as Niki Lauda bested the circuit record with a 1:13.624 midway through.[2] Reutemann was next on a 1:13.737, ahead of Regazzoni on a 1:13.801, with the rest of the top drivers plastered in the 1:14.000s.[2]

The Ickx situation improved at the end of the day, the Belgian managing to log some meaningful track time in the 76, albeit with a grimace on his face.[2] At Parnelli, in contrast, it was smiles all round, for Mario Andretti was steadily ramping up the pace and looking promising, ending the day with a 1:15.6.[2] The Penske was marginally slower, Mark Donohue recording a 1:15.731 without any major issues throughout the day.[2]

With consistent weather on Saturday there was hope of a general improvement in times and a real fight for pole.[2] These hopes would ultimately become real when Emerson Fittipaldi recorded a 1:13.614 during an early run, although the Brazilian would not improve during the rest of the session.[2] Regazzoni managed to nudge the #5 McLaren off the top spot by less than a tenth mid-way through the session, before Lauda set a 1:13.230 to take provisional pole ahead of the final session.[2]

At Team Lotus, meanwhile, the problems for Ickx had leaked over to Peterson's side of the garage, with the Swede sitting out most of the session after an oil leak was found on his engine.[2] Ickx himself spent most of the day sat in his cockpit while the car sat in the pitlane, various minor issues needing attention, although he did at least set a time that would be enough for him to qualify for the race.[2] Elsewhere, Donohue's good run on Friday was overshadowed by an issue early on, with the American racer only recording three laps in the Penske before serious attention was required to solve a mystery issue.[2]

The final session of the weekend was all about the fight for pole, with Lauda's 1:13.230 in the sights of numerous drivers throughout the afternoon.[2] First to seriously threaten the Austrian was Jody Scheckter, who recorded a 1:13.302 on his best run to just fall shy of the #12 Ferrari.[2] Regazzoni and Lauda responded by going out together, hoping to give each other a tow, although the ploy did not aid either driver's times.[2] That fact opened the door for Fittipaldi, who somehow managed to find himself on an empty circuit in order to record a 1:13.188, denying Lauda a tenth pole of the season in the final moments of the session.[2]

Elsewhere, Lotus managed to get Peterson back in action, with the Swede not really having enough time to get among the pole fight, while Ickx spent the rest of practice swapping between two poorly Loti.[2] Donohue did not appear in the final session, but his earlier times were strong enough to see him qualify, while Andretti pushed the Parnelli to a 1:14.923, good enough for sixteenth on the grid.[2] Local racer Eppie Wietzes managed to qualify, sneaking onto the grid in the dying moments of the session, as Derek Bell, Mike Wilds, a surprised Vittorio Brambilla, and Ian Ashley all failed to make the grade.[2]

Qualifying ResultsEdit

The full qualifying results for the 1974 Canadian Grand Prix are outlined below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Time Gap
P1* P2 P3 P4
1 5 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi McLaren-Ford Cosworth 1:14.500 1:14.233 1:13.615 1:13.188
2 12 Austria Niki Lauda Ferrari 1:14.300 1:13.624 1:13.230 1:13.490 +0.042s
3 3 South Africa Jody Scheckter Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 1:14.600 1:14.101 1:13.602 1:13.302 +0.114s
4 7 Argentina Carlos Reutemann Brabham-Ford Cosworth 1:14.200 1:13.737 1:15.137 1:13.482 +0.294s
5 17 France Jean-Pierre Jarier Shadow-Ford Cosworth 1:15.900 1:16.424 1:14.027 1:13.538 +0.350s
6 11 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni Ferrari 1:14.200 1:13.801 1:13.553 1:13.582T +0.365s
7 4 France Patrick Depailler Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 1:17.800 1:15.306 1:14.749 1:13.643 +0.446s
8 24 United Kingdom James Hunt Hesketh-Ford Cosworth 1:14.600T 1:14.030 1:14.101 1:13.736 +0.548s
9 8 Brazil Carlos Pace Brabham-Ford Cosworth 1:14.100 1:14.195 1:14.100 1:14.133 +0.912s
10 1 Sweden Ronnie Peterson Lotus-Ford Cosworth 1:15.900 1:15.303 1:19.737 1:14.340 +1.152s
11 27 West Germany Rolf Stommelen Lola-Ford Cosworth 1:15.600 1:14.706 1:15.513 1:14.449 +1.261s
12 33 West Germany Jochen Mass McLaren-Ford Cosworth 1:17.000 1:14.848 1:14.486 1:14.504 +1.298s
13 16 United Kingdom Tom Pryce Shadow-Ford Cosworth 1:15.900 1:15.444 1:14.631 1:15.215 +1.443s
14 6 New Zealand Denny Hulme McLaren-Ford Cosworth 1:17.800 1:15.070 1:14.754 1:15.310 +1.566s
15 28 United Kingdom John Watson Brabham-Ford Cosworth 1:15.300 1:14.757 1:14.931 1:14.793 +1.569s
16 55 United States Mario Andretti Parnelli-Ford Cosworth 1:15.600 1:15.799 1:16.225 1:14.923 +1.735s
17 14 France Jean-Pierre Beltoise BRM 1:15.300 1:15.515 1:15.396 1:15.021 +1.833s
18 21 France Jacques Laffite Iso-Marlboro-Ford Cosworth 1:16.300 1:16.151 1:15.218 1:19.469 +2.030s
19 20 Italy Arturo Merzario Iso-Marlboro-Ford Cosworth 1:16.400 1:16.358 1:15.390 1:15.337 +2.149s
20 26 United Kingdom Graham Hill Lola-Ford Cosworth 1:16.700 1:16.430 1:16.397 1:15.538 +2.350s
21 2 Belgium Jacky Ickx Lotus-Ford Cosworth 1:21.000 1:27.137T 1:15.661 1:22.502T +2.473s
22 19 Austria Helmuth Koinigg Surtees-Ford Cosworth 1:16.700 1:16.271 1:15.786 1:15.668 +2.480s
23 9 West Germany Hans-Joachim Stuck March-Ford Cosworth 1:17.700 1:16.203 1:15.709 1:16.954 +2.521s
24 66 United States Mark Donohue Penske-Ford Cosworth 1:16.300 1:15.731 1:17.071 +2.543s
25 15 New Zealand Chris Amon BRM 1:16.900 1:17.131 1:15.815 1:16.395 +2.627s
26 50 Canada Eppie Wietzes Brabham-Ford Cosworth 1:17.900 1:17.982 1:16.311 1:16.740 +3.123s
DNQ 18 United Kingdom Derek Bell Surtees-Ford Cosworth 1:16.600 1:16.918 1:18.618 +3.412s
DNQ 22 United Kingdom Mike Wilds Ensign-Ford Cosworth 1:17.200 1:18.217 1:30.181 1:16.822 +3.634s
DNQ 10 Italy Vittorio Brambilla March-Ford Cosworth 1:17.300 1:17.216 +4.028s
DNQ 42 United Kingdom Ian Ashley Brabham-Ford Cosworth 1:18.200 1:17.305 1:17.688 +4.117s
WD 37 France François Migault BRM Fired
Source:[2][4]
  • T Indicates a driver used their test/spare car to set their best time in that session.
  • Bold indicates a driver's best/qualifying time.
  • * Times in P1 were given to the nearest tenth of a second.

GridEdit

Pos Pos
Driver Driver
______________
Row 1 ______________ 1
2 Emerson Fittipaldi
Niki Lauda ______________
Row 2 ______________ 3
4 Jody Scheckter
Carlos Reutemann ______________
Row 3 ______________ 5
6 Jean-Pierre Jarier
Clay Regazzoni ______________
Row 4 ______________ 7
8 Patrick Depailler
James Hunt ______________
Row 5 ______________ 9
10 Carlos Pace
Ronnie Peterson ______________
Row 6 ______________ 11
12 Rolf Stommelen
Jochen Mass ______________
Row 7 ______________ 13
14 Tom Pryce
Denny Hulme ______________
Row 8 ______________ 15
16 John Watson
Mario Andretti ______________
Row 9 ______________ 17
18 Jean-Pierre Beltoise
Jacques Laffite ______________
Row 10 ______________ 19
20 Arturo Merzario
Graham Hill ______________
Row 11 ______________ 21
22 Jacky Ickx
Helmuth Koinigg ______________
Row 12 ______________ 23
24 Hans-Joachim Stuck
Mark Donohue ______________
Row 13 ______________ 25
26 Chris Amon
Eppie Wietzes ______________

RaceEdit

Sunday morning would be dlighted by a few organisational issues, starting with poor crowd control and ending with a huge, and ultimately time costing accident in the touring car support race.[2] As such, it was almost an hour later than planned when the Grand Prix cars were finally wheeled out onto the grid, putting the race within the window for rain scheduled later in the day.[2] However, the question of whether that water came in the form of rain or snow was an academic one, for the organisers quickly got the 26 strong field underway with a wave of the Canadian flag.[2]

ReportEdit

Unsurprisingly it was the two Ferraris which made the best start, with Niki Lauda immediately sprinting into the first corner ahead of pole sitter Emerson Fittipaldi.[2] Teammate Clay Regazzoni leapt past the second row before duelling with Jody Scheckter into the first corner, ultimately slithering past the Tyrrell around the outside of the corner before chasing after Fittipaldi.[2] The rest of the field made it off the grid without issue, with the usual jostling through the the first lap not resulting in any major damage.[2]

The opening lap ended with Lauda, Fittipaldi, Regazzoni and Scheckter running nose-to-tail, ahead of a slightly wound up James Hunt, who had the rest of the top ten bearing down on him.[2] Jean-Pierre Jarier was the closest man to the back of the Hesketh, with Carlos Reutemann, Carlos Pace, Patrick Depailler and Ronnie Peterson all in the queue.[2] Rolf Stommelen led the rest of the field in a long, already disjointed line in eleventh, although Mario Andretti was causing the Lola all sorts of problems in the new Parnelli.[2]

The following laps saw Lauda drag Fittipaldi away from third placed Regazzoni, prompting Scheckter to force the issue for third and duly elbow the Swiss racer out of the way.[2] Behind, Hunt had the Hesketh dancing around every corner to deny Jarier, although a similar tactic was used by Andretti to move past Stommelen.[2] That move put Jochen Mass on the back of his countryman, with the rest of the action beginning to settle down across the field.[2]

After a few dis-interesting laps, Hans-Joachim Stuck caused a stir by entering the pits in the March, although three laps later the German became the first retirement after a complete loss of fuel pressure.[2] Chris Amon was also forced into the pits while running at the back of the field, his BRM debut blighted by a sticking throttle that left the Kiwi a resounding last until Stuck's stop.[2] Otherwise the order remained stable, although it was becoming increasingly clear that some drivers had more pace then they were currently showing.[2]

The slowly growing tension finally broke on lap nineteen, when Mass threw an optimistic dive at Andretti as the pair came into the tight turn five/six combination.[2] Unfortunately for Mass, Andretti had seen the move coming and decided to block it, and in a desperate attempt to avoid the Parnelli, Mass threw his McLaren into a slide before expertly regaining control, albeit behind Denny Hulme.[2] Yet, there was to be a victim of Mass' slide, for John Watson had been forced to take avoiding action as the Yardley McLaren snapped sideways, ultimately having to run his Brabham onto the grass.[2] A glancing blow to the guardrail as he did so forced Watson into the pits at the end of the lap, effectively eliminating him from the race as a wave of minor issues plagued the rest of his race.[2]

After this release the field settled down again, the only move of note coming when Tom Pryce, quite literally, barged his way past Stommelen as shown by some gouges in the Shadow's nose.[2] Pace and Reutemann, meanwhile, decided to work through the rest of the second group in order to catch the back of Regazzoni, although their charge was halted by excessive tyre wear, forcing both into the pits.[2] Regazzoni himself was running in a lonely fourth, well behind Scheckter, while race leader Lauda was keeping himself outside of Fittipaldi's strike range with relative ease.[2]

The status quo among the top four was not to last much past half distance, however, for Scheckter began to feel something wrong with the front brakes on his Tyrrell.[2] After three laps of internal debate as to whether it was worth stopping to tell the Tyrrell team, the South African went flying off the circuit at the turn five/six hairpin and smacked into the barriers.[2] Fortunately, Scheckter escaped the wrecked Tyrrell without injury, with the accident later attributed to a brake failure as the South African had diagnosed.[2]

Scheckter's accident and aftermath overshadowed the steady progress of Peterson, who was picking off the rest of the second group one-by-one to move into the top five.[2] The last target in the Swede's sights would be Hunt's Hesketh, although the Brit was proving rather stubborn and kept the Lotus at bay until lap 60.[2] Now released, and carrying a bent front wing after contact with Mass when the German misjudged the Swede's attempt to lap him, it was not long before the black-gold car glued itself to the back of Regazzoni, with the pair entering an epic duel for third.[2]

Indeed, Peterson was throwing his Lotus at every corner of Mosport Park in his attempts to steal a podium spot, with Regazzoni getting increasingly out of shape as he moved the #11 Ferrari around to block the #1 Lotus.[2] However, before their fight could be concluded, attention suddenly snapped to Watson on lap 69, whose Brabham was seen snapping sideways into turn three after a brake failure.[2] The Brit manage to pull his car across the apex of the corner and lose enough speed to come to a safe stop a few dozen yards later, with the cause of the incident later found to be a suspension failure that had severed a brake pipe.[2]

His retirement would not have been news, however, had Lauda not been the next man on the scene, the Austrian plunging into a right hander suddenly coated in dust, grit and brake fluid.[2] Without any warning from the marshals, Lauda entered the turn at full speed before hitting the debris field and duly slithered off the circuit with no control.[2] Few could believe it when the Austrian emerged from the dust cloud on foot, leaving behind the #12 Ferrari with a vary crumpled front end, just in time to see Fittipaldi carefully pick his way through the scene to inherit the lead.[2]

Fittipaldi was left with a commanding lead, as Regazzoni and Peterson continued to duel for second, albeit with a brief pause on every tour as the pair came through turn three.[2] Ultimately, Regazzoni managed to get Mark Donohue in the Penske between himself and Peterson before the start of the final lap, a move which the Swiss had made at the risk of losing second to Peterson in the same breath.[2] It took Peterson until the end of the start/finish straight to get ahead of the Penske, although it was enough of a delay to allow Regazzoni to escape.[2]

With that the race was run, a jubilant Fittipaldi crossing the line almost a quarter of a minute ahead of the scrap for second, and was greeted by an equally delighted McLaren pit crew.[2] Peterson was a second behind Regazzoni as the pair flashed across the line together, while Hunt was a distant fourth after his exhausting fight with Peterson.[2] Depailler cruised home to fifth ahead of Hulme, who had to call upon his experience in order to deny Andretti's late race charge in the Parnelli.[2]

ResultsEdit

The full results for the 1974 Canadian Grand Prix are outlined below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 5 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi McLaren-Ford Cosworth 80 1:40:26.136 1 9
2 11 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni Ferrari 80 +13.034s 6 6
3 1 Sweden Ronnie Peterson Lotus-Ford Cosworth 80 +14.494s 10 4
4 24 United Kingdom James Hunt Hesketh-Ford Cosworth 80 +15.669s 8 3
5 4 France Patrick Depailler Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 80 +55.322s 7 2
6 6 New Zealand Denny Hulme McLaren-Ford Cosworth 79 +1 Lap 14 1
7 55 United States Mario Andretti Parnelli-Ford Cosworth 79 +1 Lap 16
8 8 Brazil Carlos Pace Brabham-Ford Cosworth 79 +1 Lap 9
9 7 Argentina Carlos Reutemann Brabham-Ford Cosworth 79 +1 Lap 4
10 19 Austria Helmuth Koinigg Surtees-Ford Cosworth 78 +2 Laps 22
11 27 West Germany Rolf Stommelen Lola-Ford Cosworth 78 +2 Laps 11
12 66 United States Mark Donohue Penske-Ford Cosworth 78 +2 Laps 24
13 2 Belgium Jacky Ickx Lotus-Ford Cosworth 78 +2 Laps 21
14 26 United Kingdom Graham Hill Lola-Ford Cosworth 77 +3 Laps 20
15* 21 France Jacques Laffite Iso-Marlboro-Ford Cosworth 74 Puncture 18
16 33 West Germany Jochen Mass McLaren-Ford Cosworth 72 +8 Laps 12
NC 15 New Zealand Chris Amon BRM 70 +10 Laps 25
Ret 12 Austria Niki Lauda Ferrari 67 Accident 2
Ret 16 United Kingdom Tom Pryce Shadow-Ford Cosworth 65 Engine 13
Ret 28 United Kingdom John Watson Brabham-Ford Cosworth 61 Accident 15
NC 14 France Jean-Pierre Beltoise BRM 60 +20 Laps 17
Ret 3 South Africa Jody Scheckter Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 48 Brakes 3
Ret 17 France Jean-Pierre Jarier Shadow-Ford Cosworth 46 Transmission 5
Ret 20 Italy Arturo Merzario Iso-Marlboro-Ford Cosworth 40 Handling 19
Ret 50 Canada Eppie Wietzes Brabham-Ford Cosworth 33 Transmission 26
Ret 9 West Germany Hans-Joachim Stuck March-Ford Cosworth 12 Fuel pressure 23
DNQ 18 United Kingdom Derek Bell Surtees-Ford Cosworth
DNQ 22 United Kingdom Mike Wilds Ensign-Ford Cosworth
DNQ 10 Italy Vittorio Brambilla March-Ford Cosworth
DNQ 42 United Kingdom Ian Ashley Brabham-Ford Cosworth
WD 37 France François Migault BRM
Source:[5]
  • * Laffite was still classified despite retiring as he had completed 90% of the race distance.
  • Amon and Beltoise, in contrast, could not be classified as they had failed to complete 90% of the race distance.

MilestonesEdit

StandingsEdit

Victory for Emerson Fittipaldi ensured that the Brazilian racer headed into the United States at the top of the Championship standings, and was the master of his own fate. Victory, or simply beating second placed Clay Regazzoni would be enough for the Brazilian to claim a second World title, with the Swiss racer needing to score one point more than his rival. Jody Scheckter was still in the fight, but would need to win with neither Regazzoni or Fittipaldi finishing in the top five to stand any chance at all. Niki Lauda was out of the fight, slipping fourteen points behind despite claiming nine pole positions, and was now only three points ahead of fifth placed Ronnie Peterson.

McLaren-Ford Cosworth, like lead driver Fittipaldi, would be masters of their own fate in Watkins Glen, taking a five point lead to the season finale over Ferrari. The British effort simply had to get one of their three cars onto the podium to take their maiden Championship crown, while the Italians needed to finish first or second with McLaren ideally failing to score. Elsewhere, Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth had effectively secured third, Lotus-Ford Cosworth were confirmed in fourth ahead of Brabham-Ford Cosworth, while Hesketh-Ford Cosworth overtook fallen giants BRM for sixth.

Drivers' World Championship
Pos. Driver Pts +/-
1 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi 52 ▲2
2 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni 52 ▼1
3 South Africa Jody Scheckter 45 ▼1
4 Austria Niki Lauda 38
5 Sweden Ronnie Peterson 35
6 Argentina Carlos Reutemann 23
7 New Zealand Denny Hulme 20
8 France Patrick Depailler 13 ▲2
9 Belgium Jacky Ickx 12 ▼1
10 United Kingdom Mike Hailwood 12 ▼1
11 United Kingdom James Hunt 11 ▲1
12 France Jean-Pierre Beltoise 10 ▼1
13 France Jean-Pierre Jarier 6
14 West Germany Hans-Joachim Stuck 5
15 Brazil Carlos Pace 5
16 United Kingdom John Watson 4
17 Italy Arturo Merzario 4
18 United Kingdom Graham Hill 1
19 United Kingdom Tom Pryce 1
20 Italy Vittorio Brambilla 1
International Cup for Manufacturers
Pos. Team Pts +/-
1 United Kingdom McLaren-Ford Cosworth 70 (72)
2 Italy Ferrari 65
3 United Kingdom Tyrrell-Ford Cosworth 51
4 United Kingdom Lotus-Ford Cosworth 42
5 United Kingdom Brabham-Ford Cosworth 26
6 United Kingdom Hesketh-Ford Cosworth 11 ▲1
7 United Kingdom BRM 10 ▼1
8 United States Shadow-Ford Cosworth 7
9 United Kingdom March-Ford Cosworth 6
10 United Kingdom Iso-Marlboro-Ford Cosworth 4
11 United Kingdom Surtees-Ford Cosworth 3
12 United Kingdom Lola-Ford Cosworth 1

ReferencesEdit

Images and Videos:

References:
  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: CANADIAN GP, 1974', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2015), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr249.html, (Accessed 10/05/2017)
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 2.19 2.20 2.21 2.22 2.23 2.24 2.25 2.26 2.27 2.28 2.29 2.30 2.31 2.32 2.33 2.34 2.35 2.36 2.37 2.38 2.39 2.40 2.41 2.42 2.43 2.44 2.45 2.46 2.47 2.48 2.49 2.50 2.51 2.52 2.53 2.54 2.55 2.56 2.57 2.58 2.59 2.60 2.61 2.62 2.63 2.64 2.65 2.66 2.67 2.68 2.69 2.70 2.71 2.72 2.73 2.74 2.75 2.76 2.77 2.78 2.79 2.80 2.81 2.82 2.83 2.84 2.85 2.86 2.87 2.88 2.89 2.90 2.91 2.92 2.93 2.94 2.95 2.96 2.97 2.98 2.99 A.H., 'The Canadian Grand Prix: Fittipaldi a worthy first', motorsportmagazine.com, (Motor Sport, 01/11/1974), http://www.motorsportmagazine.com/archive/article/november-1974/42/canadian-grand-prix, (Accessed 10/05/2017)
  3. 'Canada 1974: Entrants', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2016), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1974/canada/engages.aspx, (Accessed 10/05/2017)
  4. 'Canada 1974: Qualifications', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2016), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1974/canada/qualification.aspx, (Accessed 11/05/2017)
  5. 'Canada 1974: Result', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2016), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1974/canada/classement.aspx, (Accessed 15/05/2017)
Template:1974
Canada Canadian Grand Prix
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