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 The 1961 French Grand Prix was the fourth round of the 1961 FIA Formula One World Championship, held on the Reims-Gueux Grand Prix circuit in north-east France.[1] Staged on the 2nd of July, the XLVII Grand Prix de l'ACF would be notable for the large number of privateers, as well as the semi-works effort of the eventual race winner.[1]

Indeed, Giancarlo Baghetti made history by becoming only the third driver (after Nino Farina and Johnnie Parsons) to win on his debut race, using a FISA entered Ferrari 156, supported by the Ferrari team.[1] Dan Gurney and Jim Clark would complete the podium after a series of problems for the three scarlet cars of Phil Hill, Wolfgang von Trips and Richie Ginther who all failed to score.[1]

The race would also go down as an epic in F1 history through the manner of Baghetti's victory, in a race which saw the dominant Ferrari 156 finally succumb to technical issues. Hill had initially led the race, before a brief lead for von Trips was ended with a engine failure before the halfway mark. Hill then spun, taking a whack from Stirling Moss in the process, to put him out of contention, with Ginther taking the lead. Yet, even Ferrari's lead driver would suffer in the heat, a sudden loss of oil dumping him out of the race, leaving Baghetti as the tifosi's only hope.[2]

And there would be drama right through to the line too, as Baghetti snatched victory from Gurney just a couple of hundred yards from the line, a tenth of a second ultimately splitting them as they flashed past the pits.[2] Earlier in the race, the Italian had been part of a brawl for fourth that had seen himself, Gurney, Jo Bonnier, Clark, Innes Ireland, Graham Hill, Tony Brooks, Moss and Bruce McLaren demonstrate why they were the best in the world at motor racing, before the heat of the French summer began to take its toll on the previously unstoppable scarlet cars.[2]

BackgroundEdit

Two weeks had passed since the Belgian Grand Prix and the entry list would feature a majority of those competitors, with Ferrari bringing an additional 156 for a fourth driver.[1] Olivier Gendebien returned to his Equipe Nationale Belge team, but they opted not to attend the French Grand Prix, with the tifosi deciding to call upon Giancarlo Baghetti to fill their vacant seat.[1] His car, however, would be entered on behalf of Federazione Italiana Scuderie Automobilische and painted in their colours meaning he would be considered as a privateer entry by the organisers.[1]

Elsewhere, Team Lotus released an updated version of the Lotus 18, featuring many development parts that were being used on the Lotus 21 run by their two factory drivers Innes Ireland and Jim Clark, whom would be augmented by a third car driven by Willy Mairesse.[3] Stirling Moss was one of those to have his 18 updated, while the entries of UDT Laystall Racing Team, featuring Lucien Bianchi in a third car, were also ready before the start of the race.[3]

The Championship battle was now in Ferrari's favour on both counts, the Italian manufacturer seeing Phil Hill lead Wolfgang von Trips by a single point ahead of the French Grand Prix. Their third driver Richie Ginther was to be found in fourth, level on points with Moss, and seven behind the leading Hill, while Team Lotus' Clark completed the top five. Five other drivers had scored in 1961, with Gendebien, Dan Gurney, John Surtees and the two Cooper Car Company drivers Jack Brabham and Bruce McLaren rounding out the scorers.

The Intercontinental Cup for Manufacturers awarded eight points to the race winning team, meaning Ferrari held at least a whole race advantage over Team Lotus before the start of the fourth race of the season. They led the British firm by ten points, with those two manufacturers the only ones to have had cars on the podium in 1961. Porsche, meanwhile, were at the bottom of the point scorers, having been outscored by Cooper-Climax at the previous round as they rounded out the four point scoring manufacturers.

Entry listEdit

The full entry list for the 1961 French Grand Prix is outlined below:

No. Driver Entrant Constructor Chassis Engine Model Tyre
2 Australia Jack Brabham United Kingdom Cooper Car Company Cooper T55 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
4 New Zealand Bruce McLaren United Kingdom Cooper Car Company Cooper T55 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
6 United Kingdom Innes Ireland United Kingdom Team Lotus Lotus 21 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
8 United Kingdom Jim Clark United Kingdom Team Lotus Lotus 21 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
10 Sweden Jo Bonnier West Germany Porsche System Engineering Porsche 718 Porsche 547/3 F4 1.5 D
12 United States Dan Gurney West Germany Porsche System Engineering Porsche 718 Porsche 547/3 F4 1.5 D
14 Netherlands Carel Godin de Beaufort Netherlands Ecurie Maarsbergen Porsche 718 Porsche 547/3 F4 1.5 D
16 United States Phil Hill Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 156 Ferrari 178 V6 1.5 D
18 United States Richie Ginther Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 156 Ferrari 178 V6 1.5 D
20 West Germany Wolfgang von Trips Italy Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 156 Ferrari 178 V6 1.5 D
22 United Kingdom Graham Hill United Kingdom Owen Racing Organisation BRM P48/57 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
24 United Kingdom Tony Brooks United Kingdom Owen Racing Organisation BRM P48/57 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
26 United Kingdom Stirling Moss United Kingdom R.R.C. Walker Racing Team Lotus 18/21 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
28 Belgium Lucien Bianchi United Kingdom UDT Laystall Racing Team Lotus 18/21 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
28 Argentina Juan-Manuel Bordeu United Kingdom UDT Laystall Racing Team Lotus 18/21 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
30 United Kingdom Henry Taylor United Kingdom UDT Laystall Racing Team Lotus 18/21 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
32 France Maurice Trintignant Italy Scuderia Serenissima Cooper T51 Maserati 6-1500 L4 1.5 D
34 Italy Giorgio Scarlatti Italy Scuderia Serenissima De Tomaso F1 OSCA 372 L4 1.5 D
36 United States Masten Gregory Italy Camoradi International Cooper T53 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
38 United Kingdom Ian Burgess Italy Camoradi International Lotus 18 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
40 United Kingdom John Surtees United Kingdom Yeoman Credit Racing Team Cooper T53 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
42 United Kingdom Roy Salvadori United Kingdom Yeoman Credit Racing Team Cooper T53 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
44 United Kingdom Jackie Lewis United Kingdom Privateer Cooper T53 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
46 Switzerland Michael May Italy Scuderia Colonia Lotus 18 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
48 Belgium Willy Mairesse United Kingdom Team Lotus Lotus 21 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
50 Italy Giancarlo Baghetti Italy FISA Ferrari 156 Ferrari 178 V6 1.5 D
52 Belgium Bernard Collomb Belgium Privateer Cooper T53 Climax FPF L4 1.5 D
54 United Kingdom Brian Naylor United Kingdom JBW Cars JBW 59 Maserati 6-1500 L4 1.5 D
Source:[3]

Practice OverviewEdit

QualifyingEdit

The joint practice and qualifying sessions began as early as Wednesday evening, with high temperatures persisting at the start of the first action at 18:00.[2] Every single day would see issues with the track surface, melting caused by the high temperatures meaning the surface began to break up more and more as the race day approached.[2] The continuing damage meant that Saturday was left as a free day without any on-track action to allow the track surface to recover, meaning the results for qualifying were declared a day early.[1]

ReportEdit

There were no shocks to be found in qualifying, despite the high temperatures as the three Ferrari factory drivers of Phil Hill, Wolfgang von Trips and Richie Ginther swept to the front row with relative ease.[2] Hill was a second and a half quicker than his two team mates, while Stirling Moss was almost three seconds back as the best of the rest in fourth.[2] Jim Clark led the Team Lotus challenge from fifth, four seconds off of Hill's pace, while Graham Hill led the BRM-Climax duo from sixth.[2]

Dan Gurney would start from ninth as the best placed Porsche driver, outpaced by the under powered Cooper-Climax contingent led by John Surtees in seventh.[4] Ferrari planned to have Giancarlo Baghetti to run as much as possible over the practice/quali sessions, with the Italian getting more and more familiar with the circuit and the car to the point where he set the twelfth fastest time, while the loaned Team Lotus entry in the hands of Willy Mairesse would start twentieth.[2] Maurice Trintignant, meanwhile, would be the only representative of the French nation on the grid, starting down in twenty third.[2]

Qualifying ResultsEdit

The full qualifying results for the 1961 French Grand Prix are outlined below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Time Gap
1 16 United States Phil Hill Ferrari 2:24.9
2 20 West Germany Wolfgang von Trips Ferrari 2:26.4 +1.5s
3 18 United States Richie Ginther Ferrari 2:26.8 +1.9s
4 26 United Kingdom Stirling Moss Lotus-Climax 2:27.6 +2.7s
5 8 United Kingdom Jim Clark Lotus-Climax 2:29.0 +4.1s
6 22 United Kingdom Graham Hill BRM-Climax 2:29.1 +4.2s
7 40 United Kingdom John Surtees Cooper-Climax 2:29.1 +4.2s
8 4 New Zealand Bruce McLaren Cooper-Climax 2:29.4 +4.5s
9 12 United States Dan Gurney Porsche 2:29.6 +4.7s
10 6 United Kingdom Innes Ireland Lotus-Climax 2:29.8 +4.9s
11 24 United Kingdom Tony Brooks BRM-Climax 2:29.9 +5.0s
12 50 Italy Giancarlo Baghetti Ferrari 2:30.5 +5.6s
13 10 Sweden Jo Bonnier Porsche 2:30.5 +5.6s
14 2 Australia Jack Brabham Cooper-Climax 2:31.0 +6.1s
15 42 United Kingdom Roy Salvadori Cooper-Climax 2:31.2 +6.3s
16 36 United States Masten Gregory Cooper-Climax 2:31.3 +6.4s
17 14 Netherlands Carel Godin de Beaufort Porsche 2:31.8 +6.9s
18 44 United Kingdom Jackie Lewis Cooper-Climax 2:32.0 +7.1s
19 28 Belgium Lucien Bianchi Lotus-Climax 2:33.4 +8.5s
20 48 Belgium Willy Mairesse Lotus-Climax 2:35.8 +10.9s
21 52 Belgium Bernard Collomb Cooper-Climax 2:36.8 +11.9s
22 46 Switzerland Michael May Lotus-Climax 2:37.9 +13.0s
23 32 France Maurice Trintignant Cooper-Maserati 2:38.8 +13.9s
24 38 United Kingdom Ian Burgess Lotus-Climax 2:39.7 +14.8s
25 30 United Kingdom Henry Taylor Lotus-Climax 2:40.8 +15.9s
26 34 Italy Giorgio Scarlatti De Tomaso-OSCA 2:47.1 +22.2s
WD 28 Argentina Juan-Manuel Bordeu Lotus-Climax Withdrawn
WD 54 United Kingdom Brian Naylor JBW-Climax Withdrawn
Source:[4]

GridEdit

Pos Pos Pos
Driver Driver Driver
______________
______________ 1
______________ 2 Phil Hill
3 Wolfgang von Trips
Richie Ginther
______________
______________ 4
5 Stirling Moss
Jim Clark
______________
______________ 6
______________ 7 Graham Hill
8 John Surtees
Bruce McLaren
______________
______________ 9
10 Dan Gurney
Innes Ireland
______________
______________ 11
______________ 12 Tony Brooks
13 Giancarlo Baghetti
Jo Bonnier
______________
______________ 14
15 Jack Brabham
Roy Salvadori
______________
______________ 16
______________ 17 Masten Gregory
18 Carel Godin de Beaufort
Jackie Lewis
______________
______________ 19
20 Lucien Bianchi
Willy Mairesse
______________
______________ 21
______________ 22 Bernard Collomb
23 Michael May
Maurice Trintignant
______________
______________ 24
25 Ian Burgess
Henry Taylor
______________
______________ 26
______________ 27 Giorgio Scarlatti
28

RaceEdit

Temperatures on Sunday morning were cooler than they had been all week but remained incredibly hot, with Formula Junior taking to the track for two races before the start of the Grand Prix to test whether the tarmac would survive sustained running without deteriorating.[2] Two trouble free races for the Junior category and the F1 cars were ready to take to the track, although numerous modifications were made to the cars, ranging from extra vents, to the removal of side panels as Team Lotus had opted to do.[2] The drivers too were forced to take action, many including Stirling Moss emerging from the pits in soaked overalls to the delight of the French crowd, all with the aim of keeping cool during the two hour race set to start at 15:00 local time.[2]

ReportEdit

The Scuderia were untroubled at the start, the trio of scarlet cars on the front row departing as one with Moss tucked right behind Richie Ginther in fourth.[2] The opening lap would see Wolfgang von Trips and Ginther swap places before the end of the lap as Phil Hill created a small gap to the field, the rest of the 26 car field running nose-to-tail in the American's wake.[2] Behind Moss ran John Surtees as the best of the Cooper-Climax drivers, with the Team Lotus duo of Jim Clark and Innes Ireland in close attendance.[2] BRM-Climax saw their two cars running together too, Graham Hill ahead of Tony Brooks, with the three silver Porsches next in line.[2]

The second lap saw the field begin to be stretched by the three Ferraris at the front, with Hill now leading von Trips and Ginther, the latter unable to shake the ever present Moss just behind.[2] Without the slipstream effect, Surtees was under intense pressure from Clark as they battled for fifth, with a slight gap behind due to a double move by the BRMs on Ireland.[2] Giancarlo Baghetti, meanwhile, was busy carving his way through the field with his Ferrari grunt, moving into the top ten with a stunning move on Bruce McLaren which saw the two make the slightest amount of contact.[2] By the end of lap three Surtees was in charge of a cloud of privateer machinery in fifth, with Ireland taking Brooks in the tight pack, while Baghetti slipped past Dan Gurney and Jo Bonnier in the speeding pack.[2]

There was suddenly turmoil for the scarlet cars at the front of the field as Moss took advantage of a slide from Ginther to snatch third place off of the American.[2] In his attempts to keep pace with his team mates, Ginther attempted to control his slide as the cars thundered through Thillois, but momentum turned his slide into a spin in a heartbeat.[2] The next man on the scene was Surtees, and the Brit had to throw his Cooper onto the grass verge on the side of the circuit in avoidance, breaking his suspension on the earth bank that lined the edge of the track.[2] Ginther was back at full pace before Clark and co. made it to the incident, with Surtees limping home to retire his bent Cooper at the end of the lap.[2]

FraGP 61

Ireland and Clark duelling through the French Grand Prix of 1961.

Moss would continue to fend off a resurgent Ginther into lap five as Clark now led the mass brawl over fifth, defending heavily from team mate Ireland, who himself was under pressure from Graham Hill and Baghetti, as well as the two Porsches split by McLaren.[2] By lap six, however, the race seemed to be settled as Ginther slung his Ferrari past Moss and gapped the Brit with his two colleagues ahead.[2] Rumours of a decision by Ferrari that Hill was not to win the race had circulated, with speculation that the relentless pace of the American in the early stages was an attempt to ensure that the world knew that surrendering the lead would be the result of team orders.[2] He managed to pull clear and set the fastest lap on three consecutive laps, before slowing to allow von Trips and Ginther to rejoin him after the ten lap mark.[2]

Having slipped away from the Ferraris, Moss was slowly being drawn in by the ongoing brawl for fifth place, Ireland now heading Graham Hill with Baghetti also climbing to the back of the point scoring positions.[2] The order was constantly shuffling, and a misjudged move by Baghetti forced Ireland off the track at Muizon, dropping him to the back of the group on lap ten.[2] Yet, the Brit was not to be deterred, and within a lap was sitting on the back of the Italian plotting his revenge, with Clark splitting the two in the group still featuring Graham Hill, the two Porsches and McLaren.[2]

A switch at the front saw von Trips waved past by Phil Hill, who slotted neatly into the wake of his team mate as a clear demonstration that his manoeuvre had been the result of team orders.[2] This move almost passed unseen, however, as the charging mass of machinery squabbling over fifth place drew right onto the back of a struggling Moss, Baghetti, Clark and Ireland past the Brit before the end of lap thirteen.[2] Moss' troubles were found with a spongy brake peddle, although his driving style that dripped with skill saw him keep in the middle of the pack now duelling for fourth.[2] Up ahead, meanwhile, the two leading Ferraris were under orders to ease their pace, both slowing to allow Ginther to catch back up after his troubles earlier in the race.[2]

There would be more drama for the scarlet cars, as the first chink in the seemingly impenetrable Ferrari 156's armour was found by von Trips on lap 20.[2] Water was found pouring from his exhaust as the German limped into the pits, the first engine failure for the 156, a startling development given that Hill and von Trips had not been pushing for at least ten laps.[2] Baghetti was hence promoted to third, but he had to contend with both Team Lotus cars who were swapping positions almost every lap to attack the older spec 156 ahead.[2] Bonnier and McLaren, meanwhile, had made their way past Moss, who was seriously struggling with his brakes, ultimately falling from the group after pitting for repairs, a new brake line being fitted in just four laps.[2]

At the halfway mark the Team Lotus machines had finally had their revenge on Baghetti, Ireland and Clark forcing their way past moments after each other as Phil Hill led Ginther by twenty seconds.[2] The latter had made a second mistake to double the gap at the front of the field just before the halfway point, before the two Porsches made their move to climb to the lead of the third placed pack, Gurney taking Baghetti, Clark and Ireland in a short sequence of moves.[2] Bonnier followed his American team mate through past the two Lotuses, with Ireland beginning to slip ever so slightly back from the group with damage to his engine, caused by a stone from his earlier rally-cross attempt.[2]

Baghetti suddenly hit the lead of the group on lap 29, third place now in his grip after taking Bonnier, who had moments earlier pushed his way past Gurney and Clark, the latter two also now reversed.[2] He would exchange more passes with the two silver cars over the following laps, Bonnier and Gurney both making their way past the Ferrari down the main straight, before being pounced upon in the narrow hairpins by the youngster.[2] Clark lost time after taking a stone to the head, fortunate that his goggles were able to take the small stone's impact at the cost of the fixing across his nose.[2] At over 100 miles an hour Clark deftly swapped to his spare pair hanging around his neck, but even this limited delay saw him slip too far behind the Porsches and Baghetti, and without the slipstream effect he was left in a lonely sixth ahead of his limping team mate.[2]

Out front, Hill remained seemingly untouchable as he pounded around the circuit at a consistent pace of 2:38.0, paced around twenty seconds back by Ginther.[2] That was until lap 38, when Ginther swung past the pits in the lead, before a heavily damaged 18/21 swung into the pits, Moss signalling to the Ferrari crew with some glee that his American rival was out of the race.[2] Hill, as it happened, had spun on the damaged tarmac at the Thillois hairpin before being clouted by Moss as the Brit tried to take avoiding action from the recovering Ferrari.[2] The impact stalled the Ferrari's engine, and despite his best efforts, Hill was left to watch as Ginther, and then temporary team mate Baghetti with two silver Porsches swept by.[2] Moss, meanwhile, would be out with broken suspension from the collision, although his car would later be revealed to have been suffering with a damaged water pipe after the race.[2]

A few laps later and Ginther was having dramas, a sudden loss of oil pressure forcing him into the pits, although new rules prevented Ferrari from topping up his car meaning he was sent back out to try to fend off the oncoming brawl between Baghetti and the two Porsches.[2] Then, on lap 42, with Hill back in the running two laps down, Ginther stopped out on the circuit, leaving the young Italian, flanked by two silver machines, to cross the line in the lead of the race.[2] Baghetti was under intense pressure, both Gurney and Bonnier sweeping past before succumbing to the superiour braking of the 156 in the hands of the Italian.[2] With just two laps to go Gurney and Baghetti crossed the line together with Bonnier almost touching their exhausts, a fateful position for the second Porsche a lap later.[2]

As mentioned earlier, the heat in France in 1961 was intense, and the furious battle over the previous 50 laps was taking its toll on the cars.[2] Heat would pour off the back of the red and silver machines in front of Bonnier, and just a lap and a half from the end his Porsche engine finally screamed in protest having boiled its coolant and oil just a few miles from the end of the race.[2] That promoted Clark into third with Ireland in his wake, as Gurney and Baghetti continued a furious duel for victory, the American going all out to best the débuting Italian.[2]

Baghetti led across the line as the two thundered onto the final lap, with the American drawing closer and closer to the back of the Ferrari down the main straight, before suddenly darting out of the scarlet car's wake to take the inside line through Thillois.[2] Gurney now led from the Italian as the cars slithered through the rest of the circuit, although their dice was far from over as they swung onto the main straight for the final time.[2] Gurney's Porsche still led, but it was punching a neat hole in the air for Baghetti, and just 300 yards from the line, Baghetti swung out of the wake of the Porsche to draw alongside and past before his momentum ran out.[2] Gurney was just beginning to get back on level terms with the Italian as the pair flashed across the line, the timing metres stating that just a tenth of a second had decided the race.[2] And, stunningly, it was Baghetti whom had won to become the first driver since Nino Farina to win their début race in Europe, a roaring crowd greeting the youngster as he made his way to the podium a few minutes later with Gurney and Clark in close attendance.[2]

ResultsEdit

The full results for the 1961 French Grand Prix are outlined below:

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 50 Italy Giancarlo Baghetti Ferrari 52 2:14:17.5 12 9
2 12 United States Dan Gurney Porsche 52 +0.1s 9 6
3 8 United Kingdom Jim Clark Lotus-Climax 52 +1:01.1 5 4
4 6 United Kingdom Innes Ireland Lotus-Climax 52 +1:10.3 10 3
5 4 New Zealand Bruce McLaren Cooper-Climax 52 +1:41.8 8 2
6 22 United Kingdom Graham Hill BRM-Climax 52 +1:41.9 6 1
7 10 Sweden Jo Bonnier Porsche 52 +3:15.4 13
8 42 United Kingdom Roy Salvadori Cooper-Climax 51 +1 lap 15
9 16 United States Phil Hill Ferrari 50 +2 laps 1
10 30 United Kingdom Henry Taylor Lotus-Climax 49 +3 laps 25
11 46 Switzerland Michael May Lotus-Climax 48 +4 laps 22
12 36 United States Masten Gregory Cooper-Climax 43 +9 laps 16
13 32 France Maurice Trintignant Cooper-Maserati 42 +10 laps 23
14 38 United Kingdom Ian Burgess Lotus-Climax 42 +10 laps 24
15 18 United States Richie Ginther Ferrari 40 Oil pressure 3
Ret 26 United Kingdom Stirling Moss Lotus-Climax 31 Water pipe 4
Ret 48 Belgium Willy Mairesse Lotus-Climax 27 Fuel injection 20
Ret 14 Netherlands Carel Godin de Beaufort Porsche 23 Engine 17
Ret 28 Belgium Lucien Bianchi Lotus-Climax 21 Clutch 19
Ret 20 West Germany Wolfgang von Trips Ferrari 18 Engine 2
Ret 34 Italy Giorgio Scarlatti De Tomaso-OSCA 15 Engine 26
Ret 2 Australia Jack Brabham Cooper-Climax 14 Oil pressure 14
Ret 52 Belgium Bernard Collomb Cooper-Climax 6 Valve 21
Ret 40 United Kingdom John Surtees Cooper-Climax 4 Accident 7
Ret 24 United Kingdom Tony Brooks BRM-Climax 4 Overheating 11
Ret 44 United Kingdom Jackie Lewis Cooper-Climax 4 Overheating 18
WD 28 Argentina Juan-Manuel Bordeu Lotus-Climax
WD 54 United Kingdom Brian Naylor JBW-Maserati
Source:[5]

MilestonesEdit

StandingsEdit

With the top four in the Championship all failing to score, Phil Hill remained at the top of the standings a point ahead of Wolfgang von Trips, while Stirling Moss and Richie Ginther stayed in third and fourth level on twelve points. Giancarlo Baghetti, however, had rocketed up into the top five with victory, going level on points with Dan Gurney but judged ahead because of his win. Graham Hill, meanwhile, had added his name to the scorers, tagging onto the bottom of the scorers pile.

Ferrari extended their lead in the Intercontinental Cup for Manufacturers, now fourteen points in arrears as the season reached the halfway mark. Lotus-Climax were their closest competitors, but seemed more likely to be in a battle for second with Porsche after their first podium courtesy of Gurney. Cooper-Climax were left in fourth, three points behind the German marque, while BRM-Climax were finally on the board after Graham Hill's sixth place finish

Drivers' World Championship
Pos. Driver Pts +/-
1 United States Phil Hill 19
2 West Germany Wolfgang von Trips 18
3 United Kingdom Stirling Moss 12
4 United States Richie Ginther 12
5 Italy Giancarlo Baghetti 9 ▲6
6 United States Dan Gurney 9 ▲1
7 United Kingdom Jim Clark 8 ▼2
8 Belgium Olivier Gendebien 3 ▼2
9 United Kingdom Innes Ireland 3 ▲2
10 New Zealand Bruce McLaren 3
11 United Kingdom John Surtees 2 ▼3
12 Australia Jack Brabham 1 ▼2
13 United Kingdom Graham Hill 1 ▲1
Constructors' World Championship
Pos. Team Pts +/-
1 Italy Ferrari 30
2 United Kingdom Lotus-Climax 16
3 West Germany Porsche 9 ▲1
4 United Kingdom Cooper-Climax 6 ▼1
5 United Kingdom BRM-Climax 1

ReferencesEdit

Images and Videos:

References:
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 'GRAND PRIX RESULTS: FRENCH GP, 1961', grandprix.com, (Inside F1 Inc., 2016), http://www.grandprix.com/gpe/rr098.html, (Accessed 30/04/2016)
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 2.19 2.20 2.21 2.22 2.23 2.24 2.25 2.26 2.27 2.28 2.29 2.30 2.31 2.32 2.33 2.34 2.35 2.36 2.37 2.38 2.39 2.40 2.41 2.42 2.43 2.44 2.45 2.46 2.47 2.48 2.49 2.50 2.51 2.52 2.53 2.54 2.55 2.56 2.57 2.58 2.59 2.60 2.61 2.62 2.63 'The 47th French Grand Prix', motorsportmagazine.com, (Motor Sport Magazine, August 1961), http://www.motorsportmagazine.com/archive/article/august-1961/28/47th-french-grand-prix, (Accessed 30/04/2016)
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 'France 1961: Race Entrants', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2016), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1961/france/engages.aspx, (Accessed 30/04/2016)
  4. 4.0 4.1 'France 1961: Qualifying', statsf1.com, (StatsF1, 2015), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1961/france/qualification.aspx, (Accessed 27/04/2016)
  5. 'France 1961: Race Results', statsf1.com, (Stats F1, 2016), http://www.statsf1.com/en/1961/france/classement.aspx, (Accessed 01/05/2016)
V T E France French Grand Prix
Circuits Reims (1950–1951, 1953–1954, 1956, 1958–1961, 1963, 1966)
Rouen-Les-Essarts (1952, 1957, 1962, 1964, 1968)
Charade Circuit (1965, 1969–1970, 1972)
Bugatti Circuit (1967)
Circuit Paul Ricard (1971, 1973, 1975–1976, 1978, 1980, 1982–1983, 1985–1990, 2018)
Dijon-Prenois (1974, 1977, 1979, 1981, 1984)
Circuit de Nevers Magny-Cours (1991–2008)
PR Screen Shot 2017-03-23 at 12.15.31 AM
F1 Races 195019511952195319541955195619571958195919601961196219631964196519661967196819691970197119721973197419751976197719781979198019811982198319841985198619871988198919901991199219931994199519961997199819992000200120022003200420052006200720082009-20172018
European Championship Races 1931193219381939
Non-Championship Races 190619071908191219131914192119221923192419251926192719281929193019331934193519361937194719481949
V T E 1961 Formula One Season
Tyres Dunlop
Races Monaco • Netherlands • Belgium • France • Britain • Germany • Italy • United States
See also 1960 Formula One Season • 1962 Formula One Season • Category
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